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I define an enums using include,since there are different enums which have the same enumeration data and I want to reuse it:

#define X(SYM) SYM
#define X_INIT(SYM,VAL) SYM = VAL
/// Destination for scalar memory read instruction
enum SSRC
{

#include "GenericInstructionFields1.h"
#include "ScalarInstructionFields.h"
#include "GenericInstructionFields2.h"

};
enum SDST
{

        #include "GenericInstructionFields1.h"
};

#undef X_INIT
#undef X
};     

But I can`t compile the code for SDST. The compiler writes redefinition for a fields of SSRC,which comes from "GenericInstructionFields1.h". What is the cause of the problem and how can it be solved?

//GenericInstructionFields1.h
/// SGPR0 to SGPR103: Scalar general-purpose registers.
X_INIT(ScalarGPRMin,0),
X(ScalarGPR),
X_INIT(ScalarGPRMax,103),
/// 104 – 105 reserved.
X(Reserved104),
X(Reserved105),
X_INIT(Reserved,2),
/// vcc[31:0].
X_INIT(VccLo, 106),
/// vcc[63:32].
X(VccHi),
share|improve this question
    
@AlokSave It will be silly to put an include guard for the use case he is describing. –  user93353 Jan 13 '13 at 14:37
    
@AlokSave - no - you need read what he has described. He wants to reuse the header in the same translation unit. Putting include guards defeats this purpose. –  user93353 Jan 13 '13 at 14:38
    
@AlokSave Can't you see the same header files included multiple times in the same translation unit? How do you reconcile an include guard with this. And my answer is based on his code. His posted code has an enum inside an enum. –  user93353 Jan 13 '13 at 14:43
    
@AlokSave - I can. What about you? –  user93353 Jan 13 '13 at 14:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Enums are not like namespaces.

You will see the same error with the following

enum A
{
    P, Q
};

enum B
{
    P, Q
};

You can achieve what you want by this

struct A
{
    enum { P, Q };
};

struct B
{
    enum { P, Q };
};

You can now use A::P, A::Q, B::P & B::Q

Or in your case

#define X(SYM) SYM
#define X_INIT(SYM,VAL) SYM = VAL
/// Destination for scalar memory read instruction

struct SSRC
{
    enum
    {

        #include "GenericInstructionFields1.h"
        #include "ScalarInstructionFields.h"
        #include "GenericInstructionFields2.h"

    }

};

struct SDST
{
    enum 
    {
        #include "GenericInstructionFields1.h"
    }
};

#undef X_INIT
#undef X
};

You can now use SSRC::ScalarGPRMax and SDST::ScalarGPRMax

share|improve this answer
    
Note: you would prefer struct here, because class defaults to private accessibility. Note: you should probably name the enum, I've found that using Type works well for me. –  Matthieu M. Jan 13 '13 at 15:17
    
@MatthieuM. Updated. Thanks. –  user93353 Jan 13 '13 at 15:18

You can't have enumerations with the same enumerators in the same namespace. This would reproduce your problem:

enum X {A,B};
enum Y {A};

either use namespaces or prefix your enum values.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 but the latter isn’t hard at all in this case, it’s enough to trivially redefine the two macros for each enum. Incidentally, a third (and the best) alternative is to use C++11 enum classes. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 13 '13 at 15:05
    
@Konrad: you're right, I've removed that remark from my answer. –  dhavenith Jan 13 '13 at 15:05

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