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I have two tables, A and B.

Both have the exact same columns.

I need to select all the items in TableA that ARE NOT in TableB.

This is intersection, right? How can I do this?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

assuming TableA and TableB have a primary key of name id.

select TableA.* 
  from TableA 
left outer join TableB on TableB.id = TableA.id
where TableB.id is null;

This will find all entries where table b does not have an instance of table a's id.

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I get an error using TableA.*, I'm SQL Server Express 2008. What can I do? –  Sergio Tapia Sep 16 '09 at 1:54
    
You could enumerate the columns you want. For example select TableA.id, TableA.otherColumn, etc. –  joeslice Sep 16 '09 at 1:55
    
Fixed it using this: select * from ProductoA LEFT OUTER JOIN ProductoB on ProductoB.Descripcion = ProductoA.Descripcion where ProductoB.Descripcion is null; –  Sergio Tapia Sep 16 '09 at 1:56
    
You're making the assumption here that all products have a unique description. Note that if you have two products in TableB that have the same description or the description in TableA matches a description in TableB for which the rest of the data does not match you will select incorrect data. –  tvanfosson Sep 16 '09 at 2:00
    
In SQL Server, NOT IN / NOT EXISTS are better than LEFT JOIN, since its optimizer can't discern an ANTI JOIN in a LEFT JOIN / IS NULL. It will always return all NULLS first and filter them out. –  OMG Ponies Sep 16 '09 at 2:07

You could use the EXISTS clause

SELECT * FROM TableA
WHERE NOT Exists
(
SELECT Column1 FROM TableB 
WHERE TableA.Column1 = Table2.Column1 
AND TableA.Column2 = Table2.Column2 
....
)

Replace .... with the rest of the columns in the two tables.

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This is the better answer. In SQL Server, NOT IN / NOT EXISTS are better than LEFT JOIN, since its optimizer can't discern an ANTI JOIN in a LEFT JOIN / IS NULL. It will always return all NULLS first and filter them out. –  OMG Ponies Sep 16 '09 at 2:05
SELECT ColumnA, ColumnB
FROM TableA
EXCEPT
SELECT ColumnA, ColumnB
FROM TableB
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You have your terminology wrong. The intersection would be the rows that are in both Table A and Table B. What you are actually looking for is the relative complement of A and B. To get a relative complement you want to do an antijoin:

SELECT * FROM TableA EXCEPT SELECT * FROM TableB.
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Thank you very much, this is really informative stuff! One question though, you antijoin statement is based on the PrimaryKeys of the tables correct? What I mean is, they automatically use the PrimaryKeys to do their stuff, right? –  Sergio Tapia Sep 16 '09 at 2:03
    
No -- it's comparing all of the columns. It will only filter out complete rows that exist in Table A that are also in Table B. –  tvanfosson Sep 16 '09 at 2:05

or NOT IN

SELECT *
FROM TableA
WHERE TableA.Id NOT IN (SELECT TableB.Id FROM TableB)
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