Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is the best location for a file include in C++? For example:

/*Foo.h*/
#include <string>       //Should I place this between the #ifndef #endif?
#include "FooBar.h"
using namespace std;

#ifndef Foo_class
#define Foo_class
class Foo
{   
    /*XXX*/
}
#endif

/*FooBar.h*/
#ifndef FooBar_class
#define FooBar_class
class FooBar
{   
    /*XXX*/
}
#endif

/*Foo.cpp*/
#include "Foo.h"
/*XXX*/

/*FooBar.cpp*/
#include "FooBar.h"
/*XXX*/

Should I place the include between the define so that it only gets included when needed? Does it have impact to the system when you don't do that?

share|improve this question
1  
The only bad thing you've done there is using namespace std;. Never do it in headers, rarely do it outside them. –  Alex Chamberlain Jan 13 '13 at 17:00

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Generally, system header files do have protection against erroneous over-including, so this really doesn't matter.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, so there is no performance lost or anything. But it looks good practice to me to start with #ifndef, when you include 2 headers that need each other, then this can cause a include loop. Or is there also a downside on starting with #ifndef? –  Dagob Jan 13 '13 at 16:10
1  
@Dagob I generally put everything within #ifdefs anyway, because 1. if accidentally a header doesn't have include guards, this catches it, 2. the preprocessor won't work superfluously. –  user529758 Jan 13 '13 at 16:13

In most cases, it makes no real difference, as long as the inner included file has include guards. Put it where you think makes the most sense!

However, there is a reason for the convention of putting it inside the #ifndef GUARD and that is, when files take a long time load (e.g. they are on a heavily loaded network drive, or on a slow disk), in a large project, the same header file may be included many times in the same project

Let's say we have a "common.h":

#include <iostream>
#include "lesser_common.h"
#include "not_so_common.h"

#ifndef COMMON_H
#define COMMON_H

... stuff goes here ...

#endif

in main.c, we have

#include <iostream>
#incldue "common.h"
#include "myheader1.h"
#include "myheader2.h"
#include "myheader3.h"

Where myheader{1,2,3}.h also include common.h.

Now in theory, the preprocessor will have to read through all of common.h four times, and iostream 5 times. If we move the include guard out, so that when common.h is included, it doesn't include other files, at least we save the three reads of iostream. For a large project, with a huge number of files that include a large number of other files [particularly if you subscribe to the principle of "you shouldn't have to include some other file before using this one"], this can add up to quite a bit of file-reading. It shouldn't be your main choice of how/where you arrange files, but keeping it in mind a little bit is a good idea.

Having said that, most preprocessors are "clever", and understand if the file has include guards at top and bottom the first time around, it doesn't need to read the header the next time.

Also, not including files into your header files unless it's acutally needed is a very good idea - same applies for source files, of course.

share|improve this answer

The best place is at the top.

Only do things different from other people when there is a technical reason to do so.

In this case: - There is no technical difference between the two, as other answers have pointed out. - All code I've encountered puts the include guards at the top. Although sometimes they are after the copyright notice, the guards are never after other #includes.

Therefore: put it at the top.

share|improve this answer
#ifndef Foo_class
#define Foo_class

This pair should always be the first pair of lines of any .h file.

If you are including other .h files or library files which are include guarded, it may not matter, but a good habit nonetheless.

Another good habit, avoid using namespace std; in headers.

share|improve this answer
1  
Not necessarily. This is only a convention, and in this case it bears no practical difference. Also not every header encapsulates a class. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 13 '13 at 16:02

Library header files already contain their own #ifdef's so everything is resolved if included in multiple files. So it doesnt matter where you put it.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.