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i'm reading an xml file which contain the attributes of many objects of a Class; I'm using a DOM xml parser; in this Class there is also an array field (NEARBOXID), so I would know if is a good way to read it from the xml file like a single String and then split its content, or is there any better way to do this?

the file is like this:

<CONFIGURATION>
<CONFIG> 
    <BOXID>1</BOXID> 
    <LENGTH>100</LENGTH>
    <NEARBOXID>2,3,4,5</NEARBOXID>
</CONFIG>
    <CONFIG> 
    <BOXID>2</BOXID> 
    <LENGTH>200</LENGTH>
    <NEARBOXID>1,8</NEARBOXID>
</CONFIG>
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6 Answers 6

You should read as string and split it. Using a loop convert the numbers into integer using ParseInt

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ok, thankyou! this is the first way i use xml, so i want to write the best code I can –  Nicola Jan 13 '13 at 16:17
    
Any time @Nicola –  Hassan TM Jan 13 '13 at 16:22

No, it's up to you to split that field. The String.split method will do it just fine.

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ok, thankyou! this is the first way i use xml, so i want to write the best code I can –  Nicola Jan 13 '13 at 16:17

You need to extract the complete data within the required tag using XPath, and later use String.split(), to get the desired values out of the complete string.

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Since you are converting your XML to Java objects, I will demonstrate how this could be done using a JAXB (JSR-222) implementation. A JAXB implementation is included in the JDK/JRE starting with Java SE 6.

I would recommend changing the contents of the NEARBOXID element to be space separated.

<NEARBOXID>2 3 4 5</NEARBOXID>

The corresponds to the following entry in an XML schema. This means that you could validate that the element contains space separated int values instead of space separated Strings.

  <xs:element name="NEARBOXID" minOccurs="0">
    <xs:simpleType>
      <xs:list itemType="xs:int"/>
    </xs:simpleType>
  </xs:element>

Config

Then you could map the element using JAXB's @XmlList annotation (see: http://blog.bdoughan.com/2010/09/jaxb-collection-properties.html).

import javax.xml.bind.annotation.*;

@XmlAccessorType(XmlAccessType.FIELD)
public class Config {

    @XmlElement(name="BOXID")
    private int boxId;

    @XmlElement(name="LENGTH")
    private int length;

    @XmlElement(name="NEARBOXID")
    @XmlList
    private int[] nearBoxIds;

}

Configuration

The object below would map to the root of your XML document.

import java.util.List;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.*;

@XmlRootElement(name="CONFIGURATION")
@XmlAccessorType(XmlAccessType.FIELD)
public class Configuration {

    @XmlElement(name="CONFIG")
    private List<Config> configs;

}

Demo

Below is some demo code to prove that everything works.

import java.io.File;
import javax.xml.bind.*;

public class Demo {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        JAXBContext jc = JAXBContext.newInstance(Configuration.class);

        Unmarshaller unmarshaller = jc.createUnmarshaller();
        File xml = new File("src/forum14305301/input.xml");
        Configuration configuration = (Configuration) unmarshaller.unmarshal(xml);

        Marshaller marshaller = jc.createMarshaller();
        marshaller.setProperty(Marshaller.JAXB_FORMATTED_OUTPUT, true);
        marshaller.marshal(configuration, System.out);
    }

}

input.xml/Output

Below is the input to and output from running the demo code.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?>
<CONFIGURATION>
    <CONFIG>
        <BOXID>1</BOXID>
        <LENGTH>100</LENGTH>
        <NEARBOXID>2 3 4 5</NEARBOXID>
    </CONFIG>
    <CONFIG>
        <BOXID>2</BOXID>
        <LENGTH>200</LENGTH>
        <NEARBOXID>1 8</NEARBOXID>
    </CONFIG>
</CONFIGURATION>
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I think it is a matter of choice. You can use it that way as:

<NEARBOXID>2,3,4,5</NEARBOXID>

or you use it that way:

<NEARBOXID>2</NEARBOXID>
<NEARBOXID>3</NEARBOXID>
<NEARBOXID>4</NEARBOXID>
<NEARBOXID>5</NEARBOXID>

Second way requires you to have different parsing code than the first one, but you can save some code on splitting and dealing with string.

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Extract the data as a String and perform split() on it.

Better approach for it is to maintain in individual tags like

<NEARBOXID>2</NEARBOXID>
<NEARBOXID>3</NEARBOXID>
<NEARBOXID>4</NEARBOXID>
<NEARBOXID>5</NEARBOXID>

For parsing the xml query you can use XPath, XQuery or JAXB depending on your requirement.

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With JAXB you could also handle space separated values using the @XmlList annotation: stackoverflow.com/a/14306692/383861 –  Blaise Doughan Jan 13 '13 at 21:19

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