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This is a simple problem, but I would like suggestions on how to solve it. I have a Policy class with constructor Policy::Policy(const int& mode).

Depending on the value of mode, the Policy object can have different behavior and characteristics. For example, let's say there are 3 possible modes of running my program corresponding to mode=1, mode=2, and mode=3. Now, at no time would there ever be Policy objects with different mode values.

So, it makes sense to me that there would be a variable static int Policy::MODE so that all Policy objects know what mode they should be running under. The very first Policy object created would set in its constructor the value of this static class variable. Then, if any other Policy objects are attempted to be created with a different value of mode, the instantiation would exit with an error (because this should not ever be happening).

Any suggestions on how to solve this problem?

[Additional explanation added below in response to comment request.]

The program is for optimizing disease-screening policies. Each Policy object represents a screening policy and has a lot of features necessary in order to keep track of statistics that reflect the impact of practicing that policy in a population. In the parlance of optimization, each screening policy is a vector of decision variables and the objective function is estimated by simulating the policy using a natural history model of the disease.

The Policy object needs to be able to seamlessly fit within multiple complicated optimization frameworks. It needs to be able to represent not only disease-screening policies, but also any number of standard test problems that can be used to test whether the optimization algorithms are working well. The features/characteristics that change based on the MODE value of the Policy class are the following: (1) the simulation model used to evaluate the policy, (2) the code in the constructor that sets up things such as the length of the decision variables vector, and (3) the code used to display information about a given policy and its estimated performance.

For any particular simulation model (i.e. objective function), there are multiple "policy expressions" (i.e. vectors of decision variables) which can be decoded to the policy expression required by the simulation model. So, each "mode" represents a pairing of a way of expressing a screening policy with a particular simulation model to evaluate that policy.

Leaving out a lot of non-relevant things, here would be the structure of the class if there were just 2 different modes of running:

class Policy {
public:

    vector<double> x; // encoded representation of a policy (decision variables)

    explicit Policy(const int& mode) {

        // set Policy::MODE if not already set (code not shown)

        switch(MODE) {
        case 1:
            // code...
            break;
        case 2:
            // code...
            break;
        }
    }

    void simulate() {

        switch(MODE) {
        case 1:
            // code...
            break;
        case 2:
            // code...
            break;
        }
    }

    void displayInfo() {

        switch(MODE) {
        case 1:
            // code...
            break;
        case 2:
            // code...
            break;
        }
    }

private:
    static int MODE;
};

At a high level, you could say that each mode value represents the pairing of a solution with an estimator.

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2  
The design sounds wrong. Each class should represent one thing, where Policy here represents 3. Can you elaborate a bit as to why you are doing it like this? –  Alex Chamberlain Jan 13 '13 at 16:54
1  
seems like it should be explicit Policy::Policy(const int& mode) –  Andy T Jan 13 '13 at 18:11
    
@AlexChamberlain I added an explanation of what I'm doing. Tell me if you have a better design suggestion. Thanks! –  synaptik Jan 13 '13 at 22:00
    
Yeah, I have a much better suggestion; I'll write it up tomorrow, but in essence, this is what polymorphism is all about. Have a class for each mode that is a derivative of policy and implements its methods. You can have a static factory class which produces appropriate policies if you like. –  Alex Chamberlain Jan 13 '13 at 22:08
    
@AlexChamberlain Great, thanks a lot. I look forward to your write up. I have never messed around with inheritance before. Here's the only catch, possibly... Everywhere in my code where a Policy object is created, I would have to have conditional statements to create instances from different derived classes based on the "mode" of the problem. So, it would mean that all the conditional statements get moved from the Policy class to other places in my code. Know what I mean? –  synaptik Jan 13 '13 at 22:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Are you asking for something like that:

static int Policy::MODE=-1;
Policy::Policy(const int& mode) {
  if (MODE==-1) {
    MODE=mode;
  }
  else {
    if (mode!=MODE) {
      cout <<"mode mismatch "<<...<<endl;
      exit (1); // or throw something, set some flags, depending on your needs
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, exactly. That's precisely what I had thought about. I'm happy to see that others find this a good approach as well. –  synaptik Jan 13 '13 at 16:33
2  
Yuck! Throw an exception! Don't exit... –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 13 '13 at 17:49

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