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I am fairly new to Qt and would be grateful if anyone could help me with this issue. I am using Qt Creator and created a form with a PlainTextEdit. I am trying to use an if statement to validate the text entered in this text box. I made a function like the following

void validateText (QPlainTextEdit *myWidget)
{
    if ((myWidget->toPlainText().endsWith("1")) ||
        (myWidget->toPlainText().endsWith("2")) ||
        (myWidget->toPlainText().endsWith("3")) ||
        (myWidget->toPlainText().endsWith("4")) ||
        (myWidget->toPlainText().endsWith("5")) ||
        (myWidget->toPlainText().endsWith("6")) ||
        (myWidget->toPlainText().endsWith("7")) ||
        (myWidget->toPlainText().endsWith("8")) ||
        (myWidget->toPlainText().endsWith("9")) ||
        (myWidget->toPlainText().endsWith("0"))
    )
    {
        qDebug() << "Integer entered";
    }
    else
    {
        qDebug() << "Non-integer entered";
    }
}

However, when I call this function from the on_plainTextEdit_textChanged() slot, I get an error:

undefined reference to validateText(QPlainTextEdit*)

Currently, I have this code so far in the textchanged slot:

void Options::on_plainTextEdit_textChanged()
{
    validateText(qobject_cast<QPlainTextEdit*>(qApp->widgetAt(180,30)));
}

As you can see I am trying to get a reference to the object itself and pass it on to the function but I am having issues with this. Am I doing something wrong, or is there an easier way of passing a widget object to a function in Qt?

share|improve this question
    
I've never used qobject_cast but I suspect it's not meant for pointers. Have you tried using static_cast instead? –  Oleh Prypin Jan 13 '13 at 16:43
    
A different approach would be to make your validateText function a member function of a validator class. The validator class could take a pointer to a QPlainTextEdit in its constructor (and store this pointer in a member variable) and set up all the necessary connections of signals and slots. –  Daniel Hedberg Jan 13 '13 at 16:51
    
Yes I did try static_cast but I still get same error –  Dohz Jan 13 '13 at 16:51
    
Hmm, adding a validator class sounds like a better option. I am going to give that a try. Thanks for your comment Daniel. –  Dohz Jan 13 '13 at 16:55
1  
If you solved your problem, make it an answer instead. You are allowed and encouraged to do so. Once a certain time is over, you can simply accept it. Then we have a question and answer. This is a Q&A after all. ;) –  Bart Jan 13 '13 at 17:22

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Alright, as suggested by Daniel in the comments, I added a validator class and that fixed the issue I was having. Here is the code for anyone having the same problem in the future.

validator.cpp

...
Validator::Validator(QPlainTextEdit *textEdit)
{
    this->myWidget = textEdit;
}
void Validator::validateText ()
{
    if (   (myWidget->toPlainText().endsWith("1")) ||
           (myWidget->toPlainText().endsWith("2")) ||
           (myWidget->toPlainText().endsWith("3")) ||
           (myWidget->toPlainText().endsWith("4")) ||
           (myWidget->toPlainText().endsWith("5")) ||
           (myWidget->toPlainText().endsWith("6")) ||
           (myWidget->toPlainText().endsWith("7")) ||
           (myWidget->toPlainText().endsWith("8")) ||
           (myWidget->toPlainText().endsWith("9")) ||
           (myWidget->toPlainText().endsWith("0"))
        )
    {
        qDebug() << "Integer entered";
    }
    else
    {
        qDebug() << "Non-integer entered";
    }
}

And the function call

void Options::on_plainTextEdit_textChanged()
{
    Validator* val = new Validator(ui->plainTextEdit);
    val->validateText();
}

This completely skipped the need to cast from QWidget to a QPlainTextEdit or any of that nonsense.

share|improve this answer
    
This might be a little late, but you are creating a new Validator object every time text is changed, and you are never destroying it. Don't make it a pointer, and it will be destroyed automatically when it goes out of scope. Or create it dynamically in your constructor, so it will be only created once. –  thuga Oct 4 '13 at 8:55

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