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Firstly, I have a helper method that will return the number of files in a list that have a given extension. I want to get the number of audio files overall in a given list, and I have a list of the audio extensions used.

public List<string> accepted_extensions = {"mp3", "wav", "m4a", "wma", "flac"};

Helper method:

private int getFileTypeCount(string[] files, string ext)
    {
        int count = 0;
        foreach (string file in files) if (Path.GetExtension(file).Contains(ext))
            {
                count++;
            }
        return count;
    }

So, I wanted to see if it was possible to write a ForEach with LINQ that would add teh result of each method with a list and the given extension to an integer. I'm not very good with LINQ, so I started with:

int audio_file_count = accepted_extensions.ForEach(i => getFileTypeCount(new_file_list.ToArray(),i));

but I'm not sure how to go about adding the number returned by the helper method to a total. I know this could easily be done with a regular foreach loop, I was just interested o see if it was possible with LINQ.

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Path.GetExtension return .wav or .mp3 so do edit list to {".mp3", ".wav", ".m4a", ".wma", ".flac"}; –  PaRiMaL RaJ Jan 13 '13 at 17:28
    
Whoops, thanks! –  Wilson Jan 13 '13 at 17:29
    

5 Answers 5

You could use the .Count() extension method to perform an aggregation over the resultset:

private int GetFileTypeCount(string[] files, string ext)
{
    return files.Count(file => Path.GetExtension(file).Contains(ext));
}
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Like the OP, this will also count a.mp31 or b.seawave. –  Henk Holterman Jan 13 '13 at 17:37
    
Sure, that's how the .Contains method works. If you want to count exact matches all that needs to be done is adapt the query and more specifically the constraint where you could compare for an exact match against the extension. –  Darin Dimitrov Jan 13 '13 at 17:38

You can use the Sum method. Modify your query in this way:

int audio_file_count = accepted_extensions.
    Sum(extension => getFileTypeCount(new_file_list.ToArray(), extension));
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You could try this:

Int32 count = files.Count(file => Path.GetExtension(file).Contains(ext));
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    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        List<string> accepted_extensions = new List<string> {".mp3", ".wav", ".m4a", ".wma", ".flac"};

        string[] files = new string[] {};

        int count = files.Count(file => accepted_extensions.Contains(Path.GetExtension(file)));
    }
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var count = files
         .Count(f => accepted_extensions.Any(x => Path.GetExtension(f).EndsWith(x)));
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