Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am currently trying to write a concurrent queue, but I have some segfaults that I can't explain to myself. My queue implementation is essentially given by the first listing on this site.

http://www.justsoftwaresolutions.co.uk/threading/implementing-a-thread-safe-queue-using-condition-variables.html

The site says that there is a race condition if objects are removed from the queue in parallel, but I just don't see why there is one, could anyone explain it to me?

Edit: This is the code:

template<typename Data>
class concurrent_queue
{
private:
    std::queue<Data> the_queue;
    mutable boost::mutex the_mutex;
public:
    void push(const Data& data)
    {
        boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(the_mutex);
        the_queue.push(data);
    }

    bool empty() const
    {
        boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(the_mutex);
        return the_queue.empty();
    }

    Data& front()
    {
        boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(the_mutex);
        return the_queue.front();
    }

    Data const& front() const
    {
        boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(the_mutex);
        return the_queue.front();
    }

    void pop()
    {
        boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(the_mutex);
        the_queue.pop();
    }
};
share|improve this question
    
There are more than one code snippets there, which one they say has a race? –  Hassan TM Jan 13 '13 at 17:32
    
... and details are extremely important here. Please post the actual code you're using. –  Mat Jan 13 '13 at 17:33
    
he meant to implement blocking concurrent queue. what if the queue is empty by the time they use is trying to pop item from it? –  Nawaz Jan 13 '13 at 17:40

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you use empty and find the queue is not empty, another thread may have popped the item making it empty before you use the result.

Similarly for front, you may read the front item, and it could be popped by another thread by the time you use the item.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a classic error, which requires changing the interface to the queue. You could return a null value or throw an exception. Alternatively, you could block until a value becomes available, but in that case you need a condition variable in addition to the mutex unless you want to poll. –  Ulrich Eckhardt Jan 13 '13 at 17:44
    
I think your explanation doesnt reflect the code submitted by the asker. Or do you want to tell me that the scope of the_mutex doesnt include the function calls? –  Hassan TM Jan 13 '13 at 17:59
    
It only includes the function call, but it must include the calls to empty() and front(), which it doesn't. –  Ulrich Eckhardt Jan 13 '13 at 18:05
    
@HassanTM - the individual calls are protected but between calling empty() or front() and using the result, the queue can change (see Nawar's answer). –  parkydr Jan 13 '13 at 18:30

What if the queue is empty by the time you attempt to read item from it?

Think of this user code:

while(!q.empty())  //here you check q is not empty
{ 
       //since q is not empty, you enter inside the loop
       //BUT before executing the next statement in this loop body,
       //the OS transfers the control to the other thread
       //which removes items from q, making it empty!!
       //then this thread executes the following statement!
       auto item = q.front(); //what would it do (given q is empty?)
}
share|improve this answer
    
Well, I would prefer a blocking queue, but I would settle for one that doesn't... I just want to put some Jobs on it from a master thread and then retrieve and process them using a couple of worker thread –  hfhc2 Jan 13 '13 at 17:45
    
@hfhc2: See my code now. –  Nawaz Jan 13 '13 at 17:53
    
I think your explanation doesnt reflect the code submitted by the asker. Or do you want to tell me that the scope of the_mutex doesnt include the function calls? –  Hassan TM Jan 13 '13 at 17:59
    
@HassanTM: It does explain the code. Read the article. The link is provided in the question itself. I'm talking about what author is trying to explain in his article. –  Nawaz Jan 13 '13 at 18:11
    
Ok now i get it. –  Hassan TM Jan 13 '13 at 18:15

The answers from @parkydr and @Nawaz are correct, but here's another food for thought;

What are you trying to achieve?

The reason to have a thread-safe queue is sometimes (I dare not say often) mistaken. In many cases you want to lock "outside" the queue, in the context where the queue is just an implementation detail.

One reason however, for thread-safe queues are for consumer-producer situations, where 1-N nodes push data, and 1-M nodes pop from it regardless of what they get. All elements in the queue are treated equal, and the consumers just pop without knowing what they get, and start working on the data. In situations like that, your interface should not expose a T& front(). Well, you never should return a reference if you're not sure there's an item there (and in parallel situations, you can never be certain without external locks).

I would recommend using unique_ptr's (or shared_ptr of course) and to only expose race free functions (I'm leaving out const functions for brevity). Using std::unique_ptr will require C++11, but you can use boost::shared_ptr for the same functionality if C++11 isn't possible for you to use:

// Returns the first item, or an empty unique_ptr
std::unique_ptr< T > pop( );

// Returns the first item if it exists. Otherwise, waits at most <timeout> for
// a value to be be pushed. Returns an empty unique_ptr if timeout was reached.
std::unique_ptr< T > pop( {implementation-specific-type} timeout );

void push( std::unique_ptr< T >&& ptr );

Features such as exist() and front() are naturally victims of race conditions, since they cannot atomically perform the task you (think you) want. exist() will sometimes return a value which is incorrect at the time you receive the result, and front() would have to throw if the queue is empty.

share|improve this answer

I think the answers why the empty() function is useless/dangerous are clear. If you want a blocking queue, remove that.

Instead, add a condition variable (boost::condition, IIRC). The functions to push/pop then look like this:

void push(T data)
{
    scoped_lock lock(mutex);
    queue.push(data);
    condition_var.notify_one();
}

data pop()
{
    scoped_lock lock(mutex);
    while(queue.empty())
        condition_var.wait(lock);
    return queue.pop();
}

Note that this is pseudo-ish code, but I'm confident that you can figure this out. That said, the suggestion to use unique_ptr (or auto_ptr for C98) to avoid copying the actual data is a good idea, but that's is a completely separate issue.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.