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Suppose I want to define a set of functions, each having 4 overloads, the first overload taking a single parameter of type int32_t and the second taking int64_t, the third - uint32_t and the fourth - uint64_t. For each function, all overloads have the same implementation so I could define a function template instead:

template <typename T>
void f(T t) {
  // ...
}

However this is different from having four overloads because now I have a separate function for each (integer) type that can be used to instantiate f. The implementation details of f are such that it might not work for other integral types however. To address this I can wrap the function template in four overloaded functions:

template <typename T>
void f_impl(T t) {
  // ...
}

void f(int32_t value) { f_impl(value); }
void f(int64_t value) { f_impl(value); }
void f(uint32_t value) { f_impl(value); }
void f(uint64_t value) { f_impl(value); }

It works but requires substantial amount of code for each function (4 function overloads + 1 function template). Is there a way to simplify this?

To clarify, it is not desirable to use template directly because it doesn't make sense (for implementation reasons or otherwise) to have its specializations for types other than int32_t, int64_t, uint32_t and uint64_t.


I've tried using std::enable_if already and the problem with it is best illustrated by this example:

#include <type_traits>
#include <iostream>

template <typename T>
struct is_supported_int {
  static const bool value = false;
};

template <>
struct is_supported_int<int32_t> {
  static const bool value = true;
};

template <>
struct is_supported_int<int64_t> {
  static const bool value = true;
};

// ...

template <typename T, typename = typename std::enable_if<is_supported_int<T>::value, T>::type>
void f(T t) {
// ...
}

int main() {
  short s = 42;
  f(s);
}

Unlike in the original version with overloads which I'm trying to emulate, this example will not compile since f will be excluded from the set of matching functions for short.

Unfortunately std::is_integral<T> as suggested by Rapptz doesn't help either because due to implementation details of f this function can only be defined for specific types, not for all integral types.

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5  
I don’t understand why you need the wrappers. The template seems to be enough. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 13 '13 at 18:31
    
@KonradRudolph: Let's say it doesn't make sense to define f_impl for types other than int32_t, int64_t, uint32_t and uint64_t. –  vitaut Jan 13 '13 at 18:33
1  
@vitaut Ah. In those cases use std::enable_if to restrict valid template types. I don’t have time now to show how this works but helpfully someone else will write an answer using this. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 13 '13 at 18:36
3  
@vitaut What promotion? If you want all integral types supported (because that's what enabling promotion will do), just limit it to all integral types, not just int32/64. And how to do that is in the answers already. –  Cat Plus Plus Jan 13 '13 at 18:49
3  
@vitaut: Your edit changed absolutely nothing. If you want short to be included, then use a trait that includes short. Since you want [u]int32/64 and all types that promote to them, IT'S ALL INTEGRAL TYPES. JUST USE is_integral. –  Cat Plus Plus Jan 13 '13 at 19:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Something like this would work.

#include <type_traits>
#include <iostream>

template<typename T, typename = typename std::enable_if<std::is_integral<T>::value, T>::type>
void f(T t) {
    std::cout << "int types only!\n";
}

int main() {
    f(1.234f);
    f(12);
}

f(1.234f) would fail to compile but f(12) wouldn't.

share|improve this answer
    
This is very close, but doesn't play well with integer promotions. I'll update my question explaining this in a moment. –  vitaut Jan 13 '13 at 18:52
    
Please see the updated question. –  vitaut Jan 13 '13 at 19:01
4  
You know what's fantastic about this answer? It solved the updated question even before it was updated! –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 13 '13 at 19:03
    
This is not 100% equivalent to the original solution with overloads, but probably the closest one can get. Thanks. –  vitaut Jan 13 '13 at 19:47

Use enable_if or a static assert to restrict instantiation.

#include <type_traits>
#include <cstdint>

template<bool X, bool Y>
struct or_ : std::true_type 
{};

template<>
struct or_<false, false> : std::false_type 
{};

template<typename T>
struct valid_type_for_f :
  or_< std::is_same<T, std::uint32_t>::value,
       std::is_same<T, std::uint64_t>::value> // etc.
{};

// static assert
template<typename T>
T f(T t) {
  static_assert(valid_type_for_f<T>::value, "Not a valid type");
  return t;
}

// enable_if
template<typename T>
typename std::enable_if<valid_type_for_f<T>::value, T>::type
fenable(T t) {
  return t;
}


int main()
{
  float x = 4.2f;
  f(x); // fails
  fenable(x); // fails
  std::uint32_t xx = 23;
  f(xx);
  fenable(xx);
  return 0;
}
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