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omg im am so confused right now

what is wrong here and what can i do to fix it

EDIT: omg i am so sorry...i am just so fluctuated right now that i cant even ask a question

i want to assign 10 inputed char strings to a pointer array.

using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    char *mess[10];
    int i = 0;

for (; i < 10; i++)
{                 
    cout << "Enter a string: ";   
    cin.getline(mess[i], 80);
}

for (i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    cout << mess[i];

system("PAUSE");
return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}
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closed as not a real question by Lightness Races in Orbit, Nikolai N Fetissov, Oliver Charlesworth, 0x499602D2, marcinj Jan 13 '13 at 22:10

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Did you include <cstdlib> for system? –  0x499602D2 Jan 13 '13 at 19:36
1  
Can you describe the problem you're having also? –  0x499602D2 Jan 13 '13 at 19:36
    
You're asking what is wrong with this SO question? Where to begin... –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 13 '13 at 19:37
1  
-1 omg + you should ask a specific question. "Here I'm expecting this but getting this...here is where I've searched...this is what I've tried..." –  Chief Two Pencils Jan 13 '13 at 19:43
    
omg i am so sorry. i just edited it –  Robert Anthony Svec Jan 13 '13 at 20:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

What you want is probably declare your array this way:

char mess[10][80];

As you are reading up to 80 characters from getline.

Your current implementation builds an array of 10 char* which are never initialized to point on allocated buffers.

A much safer way would be to use std::string as the buffer size will be handled for you. A simple change to:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    std::string mess[10];
    int i = 0;

    for (; i < 10; i++)
    {                 
        cout << "Enter a string: ";   
        cin >> mess[i];
    }

    for (i = 0; i < 10; i++)
        cout << mess[i] << endl; // you probably want to add endl here

    system("PAUSE");
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Should give you what you want.

EDIT

If you absolutely need char * (which is not a good idea), here's what you're looking for:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    char* mess[10];
    int i = 0;

    for (; i < 10; i++)
    {                 
        cout << "Enter a string: ";   
        mess[i] = new char[80]; // allocate the memory
        cin.getline(mess[i], 80);
    }

    for (i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        cout << mess[i] << endl;
        delete[] mess[i]; // deallocate the memory
    }

    // After deleting the memory, you should NOT access the element as they won't be pointing to valid memory

    system("PAUSE");
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}
share|improve this answer
    
yea i know i can do that but i need to use a char pointer array –  Robert Anthony Svec Jan 13 '13 at 19:53
    
You're mixing C and C++ for no good reason here then... you will need to new and delete buffers to accommodate your strings –  emartel Jan 13 '13 at 20:00
    
I just updated using the data you want –  emartel Jan 13 '13 at 20:11
    
omg im so stupid. thank you! –  Robert Anthony Svec Jan 13 '13 at 20:22

You're allocating 10 pointers, but never intialize them to point to space where getline can read input to.

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Correct. For a bonus point, recommend std::string and show how it's done –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 13 '13 at 19:38

You must first initialize the pointers you are declaring here char *mess[10]; to allocate memory for them. You can do this by using the new() expression to allocate the requested memory.

char *mess[10];
for (int k=0; k<10; k++)
{
    mess[k]=new char[80];
}

Remember that after allocating memory using the new() function you must always deallocate the memory used after you are done with the data. You can -and you always should- deallocate memory using the delete() expression.

for (int j=0; j<10; j++)
{
   delete[] mess[j];
}

For more info about allocating/deallocating memory dynamically you can refer here.

share|improve this answer
1  
Your solution is leaking memory –  emartel Jan 13 '13 at 19:44
    
@emartel Where? –  Theocharis K. Jan 13 '13 at 19:45
    
Your new'd arrays need to be delete[] after usage –  emartel Jan 13 '13 at 19:45
1  
I have edited the answer to reflect the use of delete(). –  Theocharis K. Jan 13 '13 at 19:58
1  
You've got a bit of mixed up terminology here. What you're using is the the new expression, and the delete expression, but you've linked to (and called it) operator new, which is a raw memory allocation function (it doesn't create objects) that is invoked by the new expression (which allocates memory and creates objects). –  Benjamin Lindley Jan 13 '13 at 20:05

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