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I am currently using VS2008 Express on win7 64bit with C (Not C++) and OpenGL. Have this software 3d engine I have been coding for a while and its time to load objects from a file. The big change is moving from static array within a struct (done and dusted) to a dynamic array within a struct (painful).

The struct is as follows:

// the structure for handling an object
struct ObjectHolder
{
    int iVertexCount;     //number of vertices of object being loaded 

    //float fVerticeStore[48];  //actual vertex data read from file
                                     //changing to dynamic
                                    //this works but is not scalable

    //my dynamic array test
    float *fpVerticeStore = NULL;   //should be dynamic

};

Okay, then I have a function I call when initializing the engine.

  1. It instantiates the struct
  2. Opens the file holding the objects data
  3. Then reads the data to the dynamic array
  4. Tests for arbitrary errors along the way
void weLoad_file_objects_to_memory()
{

    int i = 0; 

    ifstream indata; // nuf said

    int num1, num2, num3; // variables to hold vertex data
    char tag[2];          // tag holds the abbreviation of the data type being loaded
                        //such as vc = vertexcount, v = vertex, l = line
                        //mildly similar to .obj format 

    indata.open("construct.dat"); // opens the file

    if(!indata) 
    { // file couldn't be opened
            cerr << "Error: file could not be opened" << endl;
    exit(1);

    }

    struct ObjectHolder weConstructObject;  //struct instantiated here

    indata >> tag;   //tag simply tests for type of data in file

    if ( tag == "vc") 
    {
        indata >> weConstructObject.iVertexCount;

        //set size of dynamic array ie: the Vertex Store 

        //first try using "new" does not work
        //weConstructObject.fpVerticeStore = new int[weConstructObject.iVertexCount]; 

        //second try using malloc does not work
        weConstructObject.fpVerticeStore = (float*) malloc(32 * sizeof(float));
    }
    else
    {
        MessageBox(NULL,"Vertex Count Error!","VERTEX COUNT ERROR",MB_OK|MB_ICONEXCLAMATION);
        //break;
    }


    //read in vertex data from file
    while ( !indata.eof() ) 
    { // keep reading until end-of-file
    indata >> tag >> num1 >> num2 >> num3;

    if (tag == "v") 
    {
        weConstructObject.fpVerticeStore[i++] = float(num1);
        weConstructObject.fpVerticeStore[i++] = float(num2);
        weConstructObject.fpVerticeStore[i++] = float(num3);
    }
    else
    {
        MessageBox(NULL,"Vertex Store Error!","STORE ERROR",MB_OK|MB_ICONEXCLAMATION);
        //break;
    }

}
   indata.close();
   //cout << "End-of-file reached.." << endl;
   //return 0;

} 

On shutting down the engine, the following applies

// Delete all dynamic arrays
delete [] weConstructObject.fpVerticeStore; // When done, free memory pointed to.
weConstructObject.fpVerticeStore = NULL; // Clear to prevent using invalid memory reference.

construct.dat looks like

vc 16
v -20 0 20
v -10 0 20
...

There are so many versions of this problem it is very confusing. I like to keep my code simple. Can anyone figure out why I get compile errors?

only static const integral data members can be initialized within a class
share|improve this question
1  
You say you are using C, but there is evidence of C++ in this code. Which is it and where? –  Inisheer Jan 13 '13 at 19:46
    
delete[] and classes and << and cerr are C++, not C. Your error message is a C++ compiler error message. Are you sure you're using C and not C++? –  Anonymous Jan 13 '13 at 19:47
    
char tag[2]; ... if ( tag == "vc") Does your code even remotely work? –  gustaf r Jan 13 '13 at 19:49
    
If you are a core physics coder and want to get involved check out "The WorldEngin Project" on sourceforge for this software based 3d engine. –  Lee Jan 13 '13 at 19:50
    
I try to use C as much as possible. No classes, etc. –  Lee Jan 13 '13 at 19:51

4 Answers 4

You have at least one issue, which your compiler is complaining about:

// the structure for handling an object
struct ObjectHolder
{
    int iVertexCount;     //number of vertices of object being loaded 

    //float fVerticeStore[48];  //actual vertex data read from file
                                     //changing to dynamic
                                    //this works but is not scalable

    //my dynamic array test
    float *fpVerticeStore; // = NULL;   //should be dynamic
    //You cannot initialize inside the definition of the struct.  

};

struct ObjectHolder objHolder;
objHolder.fpVerticeStore = (float*) malloc(32 * sizeof(float)); //allocate memory

// do stuff

free(objHolder.fpVerticeStore); //Free memory

Also, in C you have to use malloc to allocate memory dynamically and free to release the memory again. In C++ you'd use new and delete respectively.

Another issue is:

if (tag == "v") 

You have a char array, so if you want to check what the value of an element is, you need to index into the array and do a comparison, like so:

if (tag[0] == 'v') { }

In C++ you'd never do this:

 while ( !indata.eof() ) 
 { // keep reading until end-of-file
  indata >> tag >> num1 >> num2 >> num3;

instead you'd better do this:

 while ( indata >> tag >> num1 >> num2 >> num3 ) {}
share|improve this answer
    
I can drop the tag for now, it is not vital. –  Lee Jan 13 '13 at 19:58
    
I have tried "float *fpVerticeStore;", still getting compile errors. Also changed "delete" to "free" and get "use of undefined type 'weConstructObject' " –  Lee Jan 13 '13 at 20:03
    
What compiler errors? –  Tony The Lion Jan 13 '13 at 20:26

You can declare a pointer in your struct and use malloc() to set its initial size and then include an if statement, in the part of your code where you read from your input file, that will realloc() if necessary.

Initial memory allocation

//When comparing a string to a pointer you MUST use strcmp()
if (strcmp(tag, "vc")==0) 
{
    //You should not need to typecast your pointer as float pointer unless it is
    //declared as something else i.e. char int
    weConstructObject.fpVerticeStore = (float*) malloc(32 * sizeof(float));

    //You should instead allocate your memory this way note that I allocate
    //size+1 the +1 being for the NULL terminating character. So the usable space of
    //in your array is size not size-1.
    int size = 32;
    weConstructObject.fpVerticeStore = malloc(sizeof(float)*size+1)
    if(weConstructObject.fpVerticeStore == NULL)
    {
      //Error
    }
}
else
{
    MessageBox(NULL,"Vertex Count Error!","VERTEXCOUNTERROR",MB_OK|MB_ICONEXCLAMATION);
    //break;
}
int size = 32;
weConstructObject.fpVerticeStore = malloc(sizeof(float)*size+1)

Memory reallocation if necessary

while(!indata.eof())
{
   indata >> tag >> num1 >> num2 >> num3; 
   if(i >= size) //i should represent your current index in the array
   {
     size *= 2;
     float *tmp = realloc(weConstructObject.fpVerticeStore, sizeof(float)*size+1)
     if (tmp == NULL)
     {
        //Error
     }
     else
     {
       weConstructObject.fpVerticeStore = tmp;
       //You should now have size*2 usable space in your array.
     }
   }
   //You don't have to use strcmp() here if you know where the character constant v
   //will be located in your array i.e if (tag[0] == 'v')
   if (strcmp(tag, "v")==0)
   {
     weConstructObject.fpVerticeStore[i++] = float(num1);
     weConstructObject.fpVerticeStore[i++] = float(num2);
     weConstructObject.fpVerticeStore[i++] = float(num3);
   }
   else
   {
     MessageBox(NULL,"Vertex Store Error!","STORE ERROR",MB_OK|MB_ICONEXCLAMATION);
     //break;
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Quick question: Why do you declare size as "int" if the code is trying to store a list of floats? –  Lee Jan 13 '13 at 20:19
    
Good question because lets say 'size' equals 5. When you write malloc(sizeof(float)*size) you are saying allocate the size of a float 5 times(That is what the * means). But you can also declare 'size' as a float just be sure that it is a whole number because you cannot allocate 5.34 floats. –  John Vulconshinz Jan 13 '13 at 20:35
    
Ah, that makes sense. It is similar to the way you cannot use a non-int as a subscript to indexing an array. –  Lee Jan 14 '13 at 7:52

When you need only one dynamic array inside a struct, you have a choice of using either "struct hack" (in its original or C99 form)

struct ObjectHolder
{
    int iVertexCount;
    float fpVerticeStore[]; /* use `[1]` for C89/90 */
};


int iVertexCount;
...
struct ObjectHolder *p = malloc(offsetof(ObjectHolder, fpVerticeStore) + 
  iVertexCount * sizeof *p->fpVerticeStore);
p->iVertexCount = iVertexCount;
...

or an independent dynamically-allocated array

struct ObjectHolder
{
    int iVertexCount;
    float *fpVerticeStore;
};


ObjectHolder holder;
...
holder.fpVerticeStore = 
  malloc(holder.iVertexCount * sizeof *holder.fpVerticeStore);

Note that in the first case the entire ObjectHolder with the embedded array has to be dynamically allocated, meaning that you cannot pre-create ObjectHolder before you know the exact array size. In the second method it is completely irrelevant how the ObjectHolder itself is allocated.

Also, in the second method there might be no need for dynamic allocation at all, assuming it suits your requirements on array lifetime

struct ObjectHolder
{
    int iVertexCount;
    float *fpVerticeStore;
};


ObjectHolder holder;
...
float vertices[holder.iVertexCount];
holder.fpVerticeStore = vertices;

Choose whichever method better fits your requirements.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Andrew. thanks for the clean code. I have tested the second case above and I get one error on the malloc... error C2440: '=' : cannot convert from 'void *' to 'float *'. The reason why I chose this function is that it is not dependant on when the struct is declared. That kind of flexibility is very useful for the top down programming model I am using. The error seems be because the malloc is a void * while fpVerticeStore is a float *. How do I resolve this? –  Lee Jan 14 '13 at 8:25
    
In your third case, the code is clean and simple and yes avoids dynamic allocation, but I still get compile errors on it. float vertices[holder.iVertexCount]; error1> expected constant expression. error2> cannot allocate an array of constant size 0. error3> 'vertices' : unknown size –  Lee Jan 14 '13 at 8:36
    
@Lee: My answers are applicable to C language only, since your question is tagged [C}. Both of the error messages you are getting clearly indicate that you are compiling your code as C++. In C++ you will have to explicitly cast the results of malloc to proper type (to fix the first error). The last code example in my answer will not compile in C++ since C++ does not support run-time sized arrays. –  AndreyT Jan 14 '13 at 19:45

Chaps, thanks a ton. I have it working. However I decided to use AndreyT's second example. The reason is flexibility and independance. I need to have struct declaration at another location in the code so require (as AndreyT calls it) an independent dynamically-allocated array.

I made one fix to AndreyT's code. malloc generates an error so needs a (float*) preceding it. Many thanks to AndreyT and the other user comments.

Here is the compilable code if you need this useful function: Enjoy!

Lee at The WorldEngin Project on Sourceforge

#include <windows.h>    
//file handler
#include <iostream>
    using std::cerr;
    using std::cout;
    using std::endl;

#include <fstream>
    using std::ifstream;

#include <cstdlib> // for exit function
//end file handler


struct ObjectHolder
{
    int iVertexCount;
    float *fpVerticeStore;
};

ObjectHolder holder;

//float vertices[holder.iVertexCount];


int main(void)
{
    ifstream indata; // nuf said

float num1, num2, num3; // variables to hold vertex data
char tag[2];          // tag holds the abbreviation of the data type being loaded
                    //such as vc = vertexcount, v = vertex, l = line
                    //mildly similar to .obj format 

indata.open("construct.dat"); // opens the file
 if(!indata) 
{ // file couldn't be opened
        cerr << "Error: file could not be opened" << endl;
exit(1);

}
indata >> tag;   //tag simply tests for type of data in file

if (strcmp(tag, "c")==0) 
{
    indata >> holder.iVertexCount;

    //holder.fpVerticeStore = vertices;
    holder.fpVerticeStore = (float*)malloc(holder.iVertexCount * sizeof *holder.fpVerticeStore);
}
else
{
    MessageBox(NULL,LPCSTR("Vertex Count Error!"),LPCSTR("VERTEX COUNT ERROR"),MB_OK|MB_ICONEXCLAMATION);
    //break;
}

 printf("vertex count %d\n", holder.iVertexCount);
int j = 1;
//read in vertex data from file
while ( !indata.eof() ) 
{ // keep reading until end-of-file
    indata >> tag >> num1 >> num2 >> num3;
    int i = 0;
    if (strcmp(tag, "v")==0) 
    {
        printf("vertex %d", j++);

        holder.fpVerticeStore[i++] = num1;
        printf(" %f", holder.fpVerticeStore[i - 1]);

        holder.fpVerticeStore[i++] = num2;
        printf(" %f", holder.fpVerticeStore[i - 1]);

        holder.fpVerticeStore[i++] = num3;
        printf(" %f\n", holder.fpVerticeStore[i - 1]);
    }
    else
    {
        MessageBox(NULL,LPCSTR("Vertex Store Error!"),LPCSTR("STORE ERROR"),MB_OK|MB_ICONEXCLAMATION);
        //break;
    }

}
indata.close();

//return 0;
}
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