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I've moved a bunch of files around manually without thinking, and can't find a way to get git to recognize that the files are just moved and not actually different files. Is there a way to do this other than removing old and adding the new (and thus losing the history), or redoing all the changes with git-mv?

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Git automatically picks up copies and moves of a file. Why do you say it doesn't pick up the moves? –  Jeremy Wall Sep 16 '09 at 3:32
    
Duplicate? stackoverflow.com/questions/433111/… ...some good answers at this other question (helped me at least!) –  Drew Noakes Jun 11 '10 at 13:17
    
Edit: I just noted that "git log" works fine on a moved file as long as I call "git commit -a" first. –  user907318 Aug 23 '11 at 8:37
    
@JeremyWall I've found that git often gets moves of a file wrong unless I explicity use git mv. –  Warren Dew Mar 16 at 22:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I think it already does this. Now, I could be wrong, but I've read that git tracks files based on their contents not based on their position in the file system or based on delta/differences. In the stack I think it shows it as if the files are being removed and the then re-added, but I think I've tried this once and it still maintained the history, due to the aforementioned way that git tracks things.

Still would be helpful for someone to verify if I'm correct or not. Sorry if I misunderstood your question.

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This is correct. There should be no difference between moving a file (and using "git rm" and "git add" on the old and new files, respectively), and using "git mv". Michael: if the problem is that you are not seeing the pre-move history in "git log FILE", try using "git log --follow FILE". –  Phil Sep 16 '09 at 3:36
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Thanks for the confirmation Phil, I appreciate it. –  Jorge Israel Peña Sep 16 '09 at 3:42
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Didn't work for me. Git saw the file as being deleted and a new file being added. Not sure what I did wrong. Could be a bitbucket issue, because it looked as if Git detected the file as being renamed when I did the commit. –  James McMahon May 21 '12 at 17:47
    
it all depends on how different the file is after moving it, which is dumb. If you rename dummy.class to clean_refactor.clas, you will most probably change the contents of the file, by renaming the class name at least. These changes can make git not realize that dummy.class and clean_refactor.class belong to the same history :( –  Rafa Jan 30 '13 at 14:31
    
@Rafa renaming a file like that, in my experience, git recognizes that the file is being renamed. In the git internals, the contents are mainly what is stored, the name of the contents isn't as important. If you didn't change the contents, it'll remain the same blob, same hash, but it'll just be named differently in the tree. –  Jorge Israel Peña Jan 30 '13 at 23:51

To have git remove files that are removed or moved already, just enter

git add -u
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+1: Thanks, that's exactly what was missing. When git status doesn't grok a move or rename, git add -u fixes it. –  rsenna Dec 27 '11 at 13:03
    
This worked great, thanks! –  Daniel Apr 22 '13 at 18:25
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Can you explain what this is doing exactly? –  OlivierBlanvillain Aug 22 '13 at 13:50

git doesn't track the history of individual files and it doesn't treat moves and copies specially, that is there is no special metadata that indicates that a move or copy occurred. Instead each git commit is a complete snapshot of the working tree.

If you want to see moves in git log you can supply -M in addition to an option that lists which files have changed, e.g.

git log --summary -M

git will look at the adjacent trees in the commit history and infer if any files where moved by each commit.

To find copies as well as renames you can use the -C option, you can supply it twice to make git look harder for possible copy sources at the expense of some performance.

git log --summary -M -C -C

Note, that as git doesn't store file history (only commit history), even if you did git rm and git mv the file, you wouldn't lose any history. All changes to the path would still be recorded and visible in a git log.

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You can also set diff.renames config variable to true either in .git/config (repository config), or in ~/.gitconfig (user's config). See git-config manpage for details. –  Jakub Narębski Sep 16 '09 at 9:09

To better understand why Git does do rename detection instead of (more common) explicit rename tracking, and how git log path limiting works, you can read read Linus's ultimate content tracking tool blog post by Junio C Hamano, maintainer of Git (and references therein).

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