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I know that every string in C ends with '\0' character. It is very useful in cases when we need to know when the string ends. However, I am unable to comprehend its use in printing a string and printing a string without it. I have the following code:-

/* Printing out an array of characters */
#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>
int main()
{
    char a[7]={'h','e','l','l','o','!','\0'};
    int i;
    /* Loop where we do not care about the '\0' */ 
    for(i=0;i<7;i++)
    {
        printf("%c",a[i]);
    }
    printf("\n");
    /* Part which prints the entire character array as string */
    printf("%s",a);
    printf("\n");
    /* Loop where we care about the '\0' */
    for(i=0;i<7&&a[i]!='\0';i++)
    {
        printf("%c",a[i]);
    }
}

The output is:-

hello!
hello!
hello!

I am unable to understand the difference. any explanations?

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closed as not constructive by WhozCraig, Jarrod Roberson, Rais Alam, Anoop Vaidya, Graviton Jan 17 '13 at 6:01

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4  
Well, you don't need it if you know the length (which you do). –  James McLaughlin Jan 13 '13 at 20:32
1  
@kusur Please read this: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/5234 then review your questions and try to accept the best answer at each. –  David Heffernan Jan 13 '13 at 20:46

9 Answers 9

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In this case:

for(i=0;i<7;i++)
{
    printf("%c",a[i]);
}

You loop for a number of times (7) and then quit. That is the end condition of the loop. It terminates, no matter anything else.

In the other case, you also loop for 7 times and no more and you just added another condition, which really serves no function as you already keeping a count of things. If you did the following:

 int index = 0;
 while (a[index] != '\0') { printf("%c", a[index]); index++; } 

now you would depend on the zero termination character being there, if it wasn't in the string, you while loop would go on forever until the program crashed or something terminated it forcedly. Probably printing garbage on your screen.

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\0 is not part of data in character string. It is indicator of end of string. If length of string is not known, look for this indicator. With its help you can replace your cycle of:

for(i=0;i<7&&a[i]!='\0';i++) { ...

with:

for(int i=0; a[i]; ++i) { ...

So, for-loops and printf are displaying the same string. The only difference how you print it.

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'\0' does not correspond to a displayable character; that's why the first and last versions appear to be the same.

The second version is the same because under the hood, printf is just iterating until it hits the '\0'.

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So this means that unlike EOF character, '\0' just denotes the end of a string. Does this apply to all the escape characters because in '\t' we can very well see the effect ? –  kusur Jan 13 '13 at 20:34
    
@kusur: I think you just answered your own question ;) –  Oliver Charlesworth Jan 13 '13 at 20:35

The purpose of the terminating zero character is to terminate the string, i.e. to indirectly encode the string length information in the string itself. If you somehow already know the length of your string, you can write code that works correctly without relying on that terminating zero character. That's basically all.

Now, in your code sample the first cycle does something that does not make much sense. It prints 7 characters from a string that actually has length 6. I.e. it attempts to print the terminating zero as well.

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When you want to print a string from first character until end. Knowing the length of that string is not necessary when the string ends with \0 (Print characters until \0). So you don't need any extra variable to store the length of string.

In fact a string can have many various representations but minimizing the consumed memory (which it was important to C designers) leads designers to define zero-terminated strings.

Each string representation has its trade off between speed, memory and flexibility. For example you can have your string definition same as Pascal string which stores length of the string at first element of array but it causes that string to have limited length, but retrieving the length of string is faster that zero-terminated strings (Counting each character until \0).

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I am unable to comprehend its use in printing a string and printing a string without it

Normally you don't print a string character by character like that. You print the whole string. In such cases, your C library will print until it finds a zero.

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You mush print a string character by character. You or a library. –  M M. Jan 13 '13 at 20:35
    
@MasoudM. Well technically no. Sure, as you see in my answer, I refer to the C library and I write that You as in Thou will not have to perform that task, the library will do it for you. And technically, some processors (such as x86 and derivatives) can do things "until it finds a zero-char". So it might be possible to implement this without such "C code" if you really want to. –  gustaf r Jan 13 '13 at 20:41

When printing a string of variable length, there has to be some 'signal' to indicate that you have reached the end. Generally, this is the '\0' character. Most C standard calls, like strcpy, strcat, printf, etc. depend on the string being zero-terminated, thus ending in a '\0' character. This corresponds to your second example.

The first example is printing a string of fixed length, which is simply a far less common occurence.

The third example combines both, it looks for a zero-terminator ('\0' character) ór 7 characters maximum. This corresponds to calls like strncpy, for example.

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The purpose of the terminating zero character is to terminate the string, i.e. to indirectly encode the string length information in the string itself. If you somehow already know the length of your string, you can write code that works correctly without relying on that terminating zero character. That's basically all.

Now, in your code sample the first cycle does something that does not make much sense. It prints 7 characters from a string that actually has length 6. I.e. it attempts to print the terminating zero as well. Why it is doing that - I don't know. In other words, the first output generated by your code is formally different from the rest, since it includes the effect of printing a zero character right after the ! sign. On your platform that effect just happened to be "invisible" on the screen, which is why you probably assumed that the first output is the same as the other ones. However, if you redirect the output to a file, you will be able to see that it is actually quite different.

The other output methods in your code simply output the string up to (and not including) the terminating zero character. The last cycle has redundant condition checking, since you know that the cycle will stop at zero character, before i will have a chance to hit 7.

Other than that, I don't know what "difference" you might be asking about. Please, clarify your question, if this doesn't answer it.

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In your loop, you actually print the nul character. Generally this has no effect since it is a non-printing, non-control character. However printf("%s",a); will not output the nul at all - it uses it as a sentinel value. So you loop is not equivalent to %s formatted output.

If you try say:

char a[] = "123456" ;
char b[]={'h','e','l','l','o','!' } ;  // No terminator
char c[] = "ABCDEF" ;

printf( "%s", a ) ;
printf( "%s", b ) ;
printf( "%s", c ) ;

You might clearly see why the nul terminator is essential. In my case it output:

123456
hello!╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠123456
ABCDEF

Your mileage may vary - the result is undefined behaviour, but in this case the output is running through to the adjacent string, but the compiler has inserted some unused space between them with "junk" in it. I packed a string either side of the un-terminated string because there is no way of telling how a particular compiler orders data in memory. Incidentally when I declared the strings static if the strings, the string b was output with no "run-on". Sometimes the surrounding "junk" may happen to already be zero.

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