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I want to measure how long it takes for the 2 threads to count till 1000. How can I make a benchmark test of the following code?

public class Main extends Thread {
    public static int number = 0;

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Thread t1 = new Main();
        Thread t2 = new Main();

        t1.start();
        t2.start();

        try {
            t1.join();
            t2.join();
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        for (int i = 0; i <= 1000; i++) {
            increment();
            System.out.println(this.getName() + " " + getNumber());
        }
    }

    public synchronized void increment() {
        number++;
    }

    public synchronized int getNumber() {
        return number;
    }
}

And why am I still getting the following result (extract) even though I use the synchronized keyword?

Thread-0 9
Thread-0 11
Thread-0 12
Thread-0 13
Thread-1 10
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Java code doesn't warm up until it has been run 10,000 times. I would ignore at least the first 10K times. –  Peter Lawrey Jan 13 '13 at 20:45
    
You synchronize accesses to number, however this does not make println() atomic. In fact, the count may even have been incremented before you .getNumber(). –  fge Jan 13 '13 at 20:46
1  
Not to mention that adding from 0 to 1000 will require a so small time that the typical overhead/variation due external factors will probably make the values meaningless. Do not only get the mean values, check that they all are in the same range. –  SJuan76 Jan 13 '13 at 20:50
    
See my answer, it covers all your synchronization problems –  fge Jan 13 '13 at 21:26
    
Like @SJuan76 syas, almost every other line of your program will take longer than counting to 1000. Try 10000000. –  Martin James Jan 14 '13 at 1:01

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are not synchronized. The synchronized keyword is an equivalent to synchonize (this) {} but you are increasing a static number which is not contained within your object. You actually have 2 objects/threads and both of them synchronize with themself, not with each other.

Either make you property volatile and don't synchronize at all or use a lock Object like this:

public static int number = 0;
public static final Object lock = new Object();

public void increment() {
    synchronized (lock) {
        number++;
    }
}

public int getNumber() {
    synchronized (lock) {
        return number;
    }
}
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1  
This will not change the fact that printing may happen in different orders. –  fge Jan 13 '13 at 21:23
    
You are right. The problem was, that my threads weren't interacting witch each other. –  user1170330 Jan 13 '13 at 21:36

Output is not synchronized. The scenario is:

  1. Thread-0 runs 9 iterations alone.
  2. Thread-1 calls increment and getNumber, which returns 10.
  3. Thread-0 runs three more iterations.
  4. Thread-1 calls println with 10.
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You are not synchronizing this:

    for (int i = 0; i <= 1000; i++) {
        increment();
        System.out.println(this.getName() + " " + getNumber());
    }

So, a thread can execute increment(), wait for the next thread, and after that keep with getValue() (thus getting your results). Given how fast is adding a value, changing a thread gives the other time for several iterations.

Do public static final String LOCK = "lock";

synchronized(LOCK) {
   for (int i = 0; i <= 1000; i++) {
        increment();
        System.out.println(this.getName() + " " + getNumber());
    }
}

you do not need the synchronize for the methods (as I explain in my comment).

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Unfortunately, it doesn't change anything. –  user1170330 Jan 13 '13 at 21:10
    
Dumb me. synchronized methods are the same than synchronize(this) and both lock using the object itself. As you have two thread, each of them synchronizes by its object so they don't interfere. I'll update my answer. –  SJuan76 Jan 13 '13 at 21:25

why am I still getting the following result (extract) even though I use the synchronized keyword?

You synchronize access to the number variable, however the increment and get are synchronized separately, and this does not make your println() atomic either. This sequence is perfectly possible:

0 -> inc
1 -> inc
0 -> getnumber
1 -> getnumber
1 -> print
0 -> print

First, if you want to solve the "increment and get" problem, you can use an AtomicInteger:

private static final AtomicInteger count = new AtomicInteger(0);

// ...

@Override
public void run()
{
    final String me = getName();

    for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
        System.out.println(me + ": " + count.incrementAndGet());
}

However, even this will not guarantee printing order. With the code above, this scenario is still possible:

0 -> inc
0 -> getnumber
1 -> inc
1 -> getnumber
1 -> print
0 -> print

To solve this problem, you need to use, for instance, a ReentrantLock:

private static final Lock lock = new ReentrantLock();
private static int count;

// ...

@Override
public void run()
{
    final String me = getName;

    for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
        // ALWAYS lock() in front of a try block and unlock() in finally
        lock.lock();
        try {
            count++;
            System.out.println(me + ": " + count);
        finally {
            lock.unlock();
        }
    }
}
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