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Say you have a method that

  • takes a threshold and an input
  • raises an exception if the input is less than the threshold
  • otherwise returns the input

it would look something like this:

<N extends Number & Comparable<N>, S extends N> S ensureLessThan(N threshold, S input) {
    if (input.compareTo(threshold) >= 0) {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Input " + input + " is not less than " + threshold);
    }
    return input;
}

When run, this method throws a NoSuchMethodError:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NoSuchMethodError: java.lang.Number.compareTo(Ljava/lang/Object;)I

Adding what looks like a redundant cast makes it work:

...
    if (((N) input).compareTo(threshold) >= 0) {
...

So what's going on here?

UPDATE: My Java version is

java version "1.6.0_37"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.6.0_37-b06-434-11M3909)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 20.12-b01-434, mixed mode)

And here's a runnable example: https://gist.github.com/4526536

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3  
Which compiler are you using? Please post an SSCCE. –  Paul Bellora Jan 13 '13 at 21:24
    
How do you run it? What classes are the arguments when you make the call? –  TV's Frank Jan 13 '13 at 21:27
    
(You should be able to simplify the generics. Er, static <T> T requireLessThan(T value, Comparable<? super T> threshold) { if (threshold.compareTo(value) <= 0) { throw ....) –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jan 13 '13 at 21:33
    
Okay I repro'd it here with sun-jdk-1.6.0.31 but there's no issue here with sun-jdk-1.7.0_03 –  Paul Bellora Jan 13 '13 at 21:34
    
On the other hand, threshold.compareTo(input) works fine. –  fge Jan 13 '13 at 21:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I suspect it's a bug in the compiler. It has staticly bound to Number.compareTo(Object) which doesn't exist, when it should be Comparable.compareTo(Object).

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3  
Just a side note: for me the OPs example perfectly compiles and runs (Oracle 1.7_07 + Win7 64bit, eclipse 4.2.1 compiler). –  home Jan 13 '13 at 21:56
    
@home, the java version has nothing to do w/ the error, yes eclipse does generate the cast and also uses INVOKEINTERFACE on Comparable. –  bestsss Jan 19 '13 at 1:16
if (threshold.compareTo(input) < 0) {

will work.

It certainly appears to be a compiler error. The reason this works is that the compiler generates a checked cast to Comparable. Whereas the other way around it does not.

ensureLessThan(Ljava/lang/Number;Ljava/lang/Number;)Ljava/lang/Number;
  L0
        LINENUMBER 11 L0
        ALOAD 1
        CHECKCAST java/lang/Comparable
        ALOAD 2
        INVOKEINTERFACE java/lang/Comparable.compareTo (Ljava/lang/Object;)I
        IFGE L1

versus

ensureLessThan(Ljava/lang/Number;Ljava/lang/Number;)Ljava/lang/Number;
        LINENUMBER 11 L0
        ALOAD 1
        ALOAD 2
        INVOKEVIRTUAL java/lang/Number.compareTo (Ljava/lang/Object;)I
        IFGE L1
share|improve this answer

That's strange, the following code compiles and runs from my side:

/**
 * @author Buhake Sindi
 * @since 14 January 2013
 *
 */
public class Test {

    public static <N extends Number & Comparable<N>, S extends N> S ensureLessThan(N threshold, S input) {
        if (input.compareTo(threshold) >= 0) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("Input " + input + " is not less than " + threshold);
        }
        return input;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ensureLessThan(10, 5);
    }
}

Tested in Eclipse Juno (Java EE), with the following JDK:

  1. JDK 1.6.0_21.
  2. JDK 1.7.0_09-b05
share|improve this answer
1  
But N extends Comparable<N> as well, so S should implement Comparable<N>, isn't it so? –  Jan Dvorak Jan 13 '13 at 21:32
    
Yeah, but those generified types are erased at runtime. The JVM doesn't have those generic types while running your code. –  Buhake Sindi Jan 13 '13 at 21:34
1  
You mean, there's no such type as Number & Comparable<N> at runtime, so the compiler has to choose which one to drop? In this case, it should add proper casts to all places that use methods from an interface. –  Jan Dvorak Jan 13 '13 at 21:37
    
-1 It should be a legal call, to agree with Jan, but if it wasn't it should be a compile error, not a runtime error. –  Paul Bellora Jan 13 '13 at 21:42
1  
Sorry guys, I've updated my post. There seems to be no problem at all. –  Buhake Sindi Jan 13 '13 at 23:08

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