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I have not been able to convert something like this:

byte[] b = new byte[] { 12, 24, 19, 17};

into something like this:

float myfloatvalue = ?;

Could someone please give me an example?

Also how to turn that float back to bytes?

share|improve this question
    
Are those bytes the bits of a float representation, or are they a 4-byte integer? – Bohemian Jan 13 '13 at 22:07
    
And what order are they in? Is 12 the most significant or the least significant 8 bits? – Patricia Shanahan Jan 13 '13 at 22:08
    
They are just random byte values that i typed out – user1395152 Jan 13 '13 at 22:16
    
possible duplicate of Java: Bytes to floats / ints – Brian Roach Jan 13 '13 at 22:24
    
The exact values don't matter. What do the bytes represent? In words, how do the bytes represent a float? – Code-Apprentice Jan 13 '13 at 23:44
up vote 9 down vote accepted

From byte[] -> float, you could do:

byte[] b = new byte[] { 12, 24, 19, 17};
float myfloatvalue = ByteBuffer.wrap(b).getFloat();

Here is an alternative to using ByteBuffer.allocate for converting float -> byte[]:

int bits = Float.floatToIntBits(myFloat);
byte[] bytes = new byte[4];
bytes[0] = (byte)(bits & 0xff);
bytes[1] = (byte)((bits >> 8) & 0xff);
bytes[2] = (byte)((bits >> 16) & 0xff);
bytes[3] = (byte)((bits >> 24) & 0xff);
share|improve this answer
    
Minor point, ByeBuffer encodes in big endian and the current example is in little endian. Making them match would be great! Ty! – sam Dec 16 '15 at 14:24

byte[] -> float

With ByteBuffer:

byte[] b = new byte[]{12, 24, 19, 17};
float f =  ByteBuffer.wrap(b).getFloat();

float -> byte[]

Reverse operation (knowing the result of above):

float f =  1.1715392E-31f;
byte[] b = ByteBuffer.allocate(4).putFloat(f).array();  //[12, 24, 19, 17]
share|improve this answer
    
That helps and what about turning that float back into bytes – user1395152 Jan 13 '13 at 22:12
3  
+1 honestly, ByteBuffer is an under-used, and under-appreciated class. – Bohemian Jan 13 '13 at 22:12
    
@user1395152: please, read the documentation of ByteBuffer. And see my update. – Tomasz Nurkiewicz Jan 13 '13 at 22:16
    
thanks I will look at that – user1395152 Jan 13 '13 at 22:19
5  
+1 You may need to set the byte order with .order(ByteBuffer.LITTE_ENDIAN) as well. – Peter Lawrey Jan 13 '13 at 22:23

Convert the bytes to an int and use Float.intBitsToFloat()

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/lang/Float.html#intBitsToFloat(int)

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