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I want to know if password protecting areas of a website using sessions in PHP also requires .htaccess, or not. I'm new to password protecting areas of a site so in spite of the days of research I have done on this, I'm still confused.

The billing company my client uses provides a script I place in a specific folder that allows them to write new and updated user information to the site's users mysql database. I want to use my own login and logout pages, and I know HTTP authentication uses its own pop-up login box and offers no real way to log out...hence we're using the database to store user info.

So the bottom line is, do I need an .htaccess file in my protected folder if I'm authenticating via database and using sessions in PHP?

Many thanks in advance!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No you do not. .htaccess files provide access to basic authentication. What you're talking about would be handled by the web site scripts. The big thing you need to remember is to always check on page load for a valid session and failing that redirect to a login page.

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@llion, thank you for that. I was figuring this was the way to go but I needed verification, again, thank you! As for checking on page load for a valid session, I'm assuming this is handled with a conditional statement at the top of the page code? –  wordman Jan 13 '13 at 23:06
    
Yes and php provides several functions for this. Most likely you would store a cookie on the user's machine with a session token and use that to retrieve their session from your database or session store. –  Ilion Jan 13 '13 at 23:10

See this article on REST based authentication (via Apache) : http://www.berenddeboer.net/rest/authentication.html

As you stated that you plan to implement your own authentication system using php session and i presume mysql, then you will not require a .htaccess file to accomplish this.

As far as this goes via PHP I still make use of a now very heavily modified system that was contained in a sitepoint book build your own website the right way.

It basically entails loading a set on controller functions that either relate to storing information within the session or checking that stored info against the database.

I can then use things like this to restrict access to certain pages by placing it before everything else :

if (!userIsLoggedIn())
{
    include "$docRoot/html/main/login.html.php";
    exit();
}

if (!userHasRole('Site Admin'))
{
    $error = 'Only a website administrator may access this page, your ip address has been logged and a notification sent to our support team as this is considered as an unauthorized access attempt.';
    unset($_SESSION['loggedIn']);
    include "$docRoot/html/main/accessdenied.html.php";
    exit();
}

if (!userHasActiveAccount())
{
    $error = 'Sorry but your account has been disabled. For futher information please contact support.';
    unset($_SESSION['loggedIn']);
    include "$docRoot/html/main/accessdenied.html.php";
    exit();
}
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many thanks for all of that. I'm guessing this is what llion had mentioned about verifying a valid session on page load. –  wordman Jan 13 '13 at 23:09
    
Its a pleasure, hope it made some sense and yes those are examples of what he/she was talking about in that regard. Good luck! –  IndigoIdentity Jan 13 '13 at 23:26

If every file in the directory is implemented via PHP, then you have no need for htaccess. However, if their are non-php files in the directory that need protected, those files will NOT be protected. If you have a sales chart or something like that stored as an image on the file server, then those will be visible to anyone who can manage to find them.

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This is true, but you do not want to try using both. If it is essential every file is locked down you would more likely want to implement some sort of url rewriting, which can get messy. –  Ilion Jan 13 '13 at 22:52
    
@Tom, very good info. All of my pages are pagename.php so if I understand correctly, as long as my pages are .php, whatever content is in them is secure? If not, how would I secure them? –  wordman Jan 13 '13 at 23:04
    
The content in the php file is as secure as the implementation of your PHP code. If your PHP code has no security, then the file is not secure. This applies to each and every page. Requiring a user to login on one page and transferring them to another page that does not validate the login credentials is not a secure method. You must implement security on each and every page. This security should be implemented via an included file to reduce redundancy, but none the less, that will need included on each file –  Tom Jan 14 '13 at 0:36

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