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I need a function which adds a new column (with constant values) to a dataframe df. My attempt so far is this:

f = function(df, col.name, col.value){
  df$col.name = col.value
  print(df)
 }

A typical input would be:

f(df, "New column", NA)

This would give me a new column with value NA, however, it would be named col.name.

Any help much appreciated.

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3  
Should the function return your data.frame, or modify it in the parent environment? Plus, I think it should warn you when you supply an existing column in col.name. –  Theodore Lytras Jan 13 '13 at 22:29
    
I'm not using environments yet as I am just beginning in R so I guess I'm just looking for the function to return the data frame. –  user32259 Jan 13 '13 at 22:45
    
You are picking the wrong answer. The "$<-" function is already built in to R. It gets translated into one version of [[<-. Failing to understand that aspect of the language is a major cause of noob-frustration. You might also want to look at the within function. –  BondedDust Jan 14 '13 at 1:27
    
Have you got any recommendations on how I could learn about 'this aspect of the language'. Cheers –  user32259 Jan 14 '13 at 13:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

R has in-built functions for this sort of thing, namely $<- for assigning a single column of data.

> test <- data.frame(a=1:3,b=4:6)

> test
  a b
1 1 4
2 2 5
3 3 6

> `$<-`(test,"new_column",NA)
  a b new_column
1 1 4         NA
2 2 5         NA
3 3 6         NA

As @MatthewLundberg says in the comment below, you could assign this to your new function if you want to avoid the funky function name:

> f <- `$<-`
> f(test,"new_column",NA)
  a b new_column
1 1 4         NA
2 2 5         NA
3 3 6         NA
share|improve this answer
    
f <- `$<-` –  Matthew Lundberg Jan 13 '13 at 23:02
    
cheers. thanks for your help –  user32259 Jan 14 '13 at 13:48
    
I am just playing with this now. But it seems that $<- is like transform in base R. Am I wrong? –  jazzurro Dec 12 at 3:44
    
@jazzurro - it functions similarly to transform, yes. It's directly analogous to taking a copy of the data.frame, adding a column, then returning that copy. "$<-"(test,"new_column",NA) is the translation of test$new_column <- NA –  thelatemail Dec 12 at 4:04
    
@thelatemail I see. Then, when would $<- shine more? Is there any case we prefer/need the function? –  jazzurro Dec 12 at 4:09
f = function(df, col.name, col.value){
  df[[col.name]] <- col.value
  print(df)
 }

If you want to accommodate @flodel's and @theodore's comments you could use something like:

f <- function(df, col.name, col.value, overwrite = FALSE){

    if ( col.name %in colnames(df) ) {
        if ( overwrite ) {
            warning(paste("column", col.name, "overwritten!"))
        } else {
            stop(paste("column", col.name, "already exists!"))
        }
    }

    df[[col.name]] <- col.value 
    return(df)
}
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thanks. out of interest do you know why my attempt didn't work? –  user32259 Jan 13 '13 at 22:51
1  
As pointed out, it is really preferred to just return df. If you use print(df), the function will still return df so you can assign it, but the new data.frame will be printed no matter what, even if you assign it. Most people would agree that this is not a desirable feature. If instead the function just returns df, the new data.frame will still be printed if you are running from the command line of an interactive session and the output is not assigned to anything. –  flodel Jan 13 '13 at 22:56
    
@user32259 your attempt didn't work because indexing by $ cannot (easily) use the contents of a variable for the index. –  Matthew Lundberg Jan 13 '13 at 22:59

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