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>>> class StrictList(list):
...     def __init__(self,content=None):
...         if not content:
...             self.content = []
...             self.type = None
...         else:
...             content = list(content)
...             cc = content[0].__class__
...             if l_any(lambda x: x.__class__ != cc, content):
...                 raise Exception("List items must be of the same type")
...             else:
...                 self.content = content
...                 self.type = cc
... 
>>> x = StrictList([1,2,3,4,5])
>>> x
[]
>>> x.content
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5]

I would like to be able to return the contents when calling x not x.content

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closed as not a real question by Martijn Pieters, 0x499602D2, t0mm13b, competent_tech, Bohemian Jan 14 '13 at 1:12

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
I have edited to I is hopefully a bit clearer... –  The man on the Clapham omnibus Jan 13 '13 at 22:33
    
Now you have a question :-) –  Martijn Pieters Jan 13 '13 at 22:36
    
That Exception would be better off being a TypeException, too! –  Ben Jan 13 '13 at 22:40
    
yeah, I was just writing it quickly to try out an idea... Thanks for the heads up –  The man on the Clapham omnibus Jan 13 '13 at 22:41
    
Please improve the title for SEO. There is no question right now –  rds Jan 14 '13 at 0:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are trying to subclass list but never call the list __init__ method. Add this:

super(StrictList, self).__init__(content)

to add the items to self. There is no need to assign to self.content:

>>> class StrictList(list):
...     def __init__(self,content=None):
...         super(StrictList, self).__init__(content)
... 
>>> s = StrictList([1, 2, 3])
>>> len(s)
3
>>> s[0]
1
share|improve this answer
    
exactly what I was looking for. Will accept when the time allows –  The man on the Clapham omnibus Jan 13 '13 at 22:39
1  
Aaand for Python 3, you can simply do super().__init__(content):) –  user1632861 Jan 13 '13 at 23:20

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