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I'm new to Scala and exploring possibilities of implicit conversions and famous cake pattern. I tried to create the model class which has the id value listed as abstract type to avoid leaking implementation details. I also mixed it into cake pattern trait wrapper. Everything works fine except for implicit conversion from id to JSON (within Play framework). Scala compiler just can't find implicit conversion no matter what I do.

Here's the code that reproduces the the problem:

import anorm._
import play.api.libs.json._

trait Card {
  type Key
  val NoId: Key
  val id: Key
  val name: String
}

trait CardModelComponent {
  val cardModel: CardModel
  trait CardModel {
    def findById(id: Long): Option[Card]
    def findAll: Seq[Card]
    def delete(id: Long)
    def create(name: String): Option[Card]
  }
}

trait CardModelComponentImpl extends CardModelComponent {
  case class CardImpl(id: Pk[Long], name: String) extends Card {
    type Key = Pk[Long]

    object Key extends Writes[Key] {
      implicit def writes(key: Key): JsValue = {
        key match {
          case Id(idVal: Long) => JsNumber(idVal)
          case _ => JsNull
        }
      }
    }
    val NoId = NotAssigned
  }

  class CardModelImpl extends CardModel {
    def findById(id: Long): Option[Card] = { None }
    def findAll: Seq[Card] = { Seq(CardImpl(Id(1), "Some card"))}
    def delete(id: Long) {}
    def create(name: String): Option[Card] = { Some(CardImpl(Id(1), name)) }
  }
}

object ComponentsRegistry extends
CardModelComponentImpl {

  val cardModel = new CardModelImpl
}

val card = ComponentsRegistry.cardModel.create("Test card").get
Json.toJson(card.id)

Error output I'm getting is like follows:

> card: Card = CardImpl(1,Test card)
> <console>:19: error: No Json deserializer found for type card.Key. Try to implem
  ent an implicit Writes or Format for this type.
                Json.toJson(card.id)
                           ^

Is there any way to make it work? Looks like cake pattern wrapping hides too much type information from compiler, as I guess from card.Key type name.

I also tried to create Writer implementation for Pk directly with same error as result.

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Like Jesper Nordenberg wrote, you have to bring the instance of Writes[Key] into scope. One way of doing that would be to demand that the implementation of Card publishes the Writer instance and then import that whereever you call toJson, like this:

...

trait Card {
  type Key

  val NoId: Key
  val id: Key
  val name: String
  implicit val Key: Writes[Key]
}

...

trait CardModelComponentImpl extends CardModelComponent {
  case class CardImpl(id: Pk[Long], name: String) extends Card {
    type Key = Pk[Long]

    implicit object Key extends Writes[Key] {
      def writes(key: Key): JsValue = {
        key match {
          case Id(idVal: Long) => JsNumber(idVal)
          case _ => JsNull
        }
      }
    }

    val NoId = NotAssigned
  }

  class CardModelImpl extends CardModel {
    def findById(id: Long): Option[Card] = { None }
    def findAll: Seq[Card] = { Seq(CardImpl(Id(1), "Some card"))}
    def delete(id: Long) {}
    def create(name: String): Option[Card] = { Some(CardImpl(Id(1), name)) }
  }
}

...

val card = ComponentsRegistry.cardModel.create("Test card").get
import card.Key
Json.toJson(card.id)

or pass it explicitly:

val card = ComponentsRegistry.cardModel.create("Test card").get
Json.toJson(card.id)(card.Key)
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! That worked. However, is there any way to avoid "import tax" in this scenario? I want to avoid consumer code making this kind of import card.Key statements. –  Michael Korbakov Jan 14 '13 at 11:56
    
I wanted to piggyback on implicit import of companion object, but it doesn't seem to work with all these abstractions. –  Michael Korbakov Jan 14 '13 at 12:04
    
The problem is that the implicit scope is rather small here. Here's the reasoning as I understand it: the type that is looked for is Writes[Key] which expands to Writes[Pk[Long]]. So only the companions of Writes, Pk and Long are searched (if there are any). Neither of these are under your control, so you're out of luck. The underlying design issue is probably that you can't hide the types of the implementation and have them available implicitly at the same time; that kind of contradicts itself (at least in my head =^.^= ) –  user500592 Jan 14 '13 at 16:16
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It's the Writes[Key] instance that should be implicit, not the writes() member method. The implicit instance also has to be in scope where the toJson() method is called.

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I tried @asflierl suggestion and it worked. However is it possible to avoid explicit import of card.Key object in the scope? –  Michael Korbakov Jan 14 '13 at 13:38
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I've modified your code little bit. I hope this is helpful for you.

package models
import anorm._
import play.api.libs.json._

trait Card[T] {
  val NoId: T
  val id: T
  val name: String
}

trait CardModelComponent[T] {
  val cardModel: CardModel
  trait CardModel {
    def findById(id: Long): Option[Card[T]]
    def findAll: Seq[Card[T]]
    def delete(id: Long)
    def create(name: String): Option[Card[T]]
  }
}

trait CardModelComponentImpl extends CardModelComponent[Pk[Long]] {
  type Key = Pk[Long]
  case class CardImpl(id: Key, name: String) extends Card[Key] {
    val NoId = NotAssigned
  }


  class CardModelImpl extends CardModel {
    def findById(id: Long): Option[Card[Key]] = { None }
    def findAll: Seq[Card[Key]] = { Seq(CardImpl(Id(1), "Some card"))}
    def delete(id: Long) {}
    def create(name: String): Option[Card[Key]] = { Some(CardImpl(Id(1), name)) }
  }
}

object ComponentsRegistry extends CardModelComponentImpl {
  val cardModel = new CardModelImpl
  implicit object KeyWrites extends Writes[Key] {
    def writes(key: Key): JsValue = {
      key match {
        case Id(idVal: Long) => JsNumber(idVal)
        case _ => JsNull
      }
    }
  }
}

And then you can use like this:

import models.ComponentsRegistry
import models.ComponentsRegistry.KeyWrites
val card = ComponentsRegistry.cardModel.create("Test card").get
Json.toJson(card.id)
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure if changing abstract type to type parameter changes anything. Correct me if I'm wrong, but it's explicit import of KeyWrites instance that matters, isn't it? –  Michael Korbakov Jan 14 '13 at 12:02
    
Changing abstract is just refactoring. You need to import of KeyWrites explicitly. This may be helpful. –  buster84 Jan 14 '13 at 13:01
    
On the topic unrelated to original question, why do you prefer type parameter to abstract class? I tried this approach first and decided that it's not as convenient as abstract type in base class. I don't like that type parameter must be passed all around. –  Michael Korbakov Jan 14 '13 at 13:35
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