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{
   public class EFProductRepository : IProductsRepository
    {
        private EFDbContext context = new EFDbContext();

        public IQueryable<Product> Products {
            get { return context.Products; }

        }

        public void SaveProduct(Product product)
        {
            if (product.ProductID == 0)
            {
                context.Products.Add(product);
            }
            else 
            {
               Product prod = context.Products.First(x => x.ProductID ==             product.ProductID);
                prod.Description = product.Description;
                prod.Category = product.Category;
                prod.Name = product.Name;
                prod.Price = product.Price;
            }


            context.SaveChanges();


        }

        public void DeleteProduct(Product product) {

            context.Products.Remove(product);
            context.SaveChanges();


        }

    }
}

I'm fairly new to ASP.NET and while doing a tutorial, I'm having trouble understanding how saving to the context works, particularly I mean this part:

  else 
                {
                   Product prod = context.Products.First(x => x.ProductID ==             product.ProductID);
                    prod.Description = product.Description;
                    prod.Category = product.Category;
                    prod.Name = product.Name;
                    prod.Price = product.Price;
                }


                context.SaveChanges();

From what I learned about OOP, an object that's created locally exists only within the confines it was created in. How does the "Product prod", which contains the changed values from "Product product" associate itself with the "context" and successfully save the changes?

Also, How does the "context.SaveChanges()" call work since it doesn't send any "Product"-type parameters?

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1 Answer 1

           {
               Product prod = context.Products.First(x => x.ProductID == ...
                prod.Description = product.Description;
                prod.Category = product.Category;
                prod.Name = product.Name;
                prod.Price = product.Price;
            }

this works because prod is a specific item out of the context, it has a unique id assigned to it , you can change other properities other then the id -in this example description,category,name, and price and it gets stored in this object from the context. The context knows that changes have been made to an object that was pulled from it, and therefore context.saveChanges() works. If you were to do this:

           {
                Product prod = new Product()
                prod.Description = product.Description;
                prod.Category = product.Category;
                prod.Name = product.Name;
                prod.Price = product.Price;
            }

That would not work, because it is not an object pulled from the context. In this case insert would have to be done, then saveChanges If that doesn't make sense to you I could probably explain more

share|improve this answer
    
hmmm well when I declare Product prod = new Product() and then do "Product prod = context.Products.First(x => x.ProductID == product.ProductID);" it still works. The thing is I don't understand how all of this works basically because I always thought that a newly declared object (prod in this case) is independent and context isn't assigned to prod in any way, that's why it probably doesn't make sense to me, also the fact that prod shouldn't exist beyond the else clause –  Andrew B Jan 14 '13 at 0:54
1  
its a little confusing I guess till you get used to it, prod won't exist after the else clause , but context (and the changes made to it's objects) does –  Scott Selby Jan 14 '13 at 0:56

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