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This has been boggling me, the simple code:

int main()
{
    typedef std::string::size_type stype;
    std::cout << "What is your first name?\n";
    std::string first,second,fullname;
    std::cin >> first;
    std::cout << "What is your second name?\n";
    std::cin >> second;
    char * backwards;
    fullname = first + " " + second;
    stype fnsize = fullname.size();    
    backwards = new char [fnsize];
    stype b = 0;
    for(stype a = fnsize; a != 0; --a)
    {
       backwards[b++] = fullname[a - 1];
    }
    std::cout << backwards << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

Works most of the time, but when I write a name like my own, stanislaw terziev, I get an output veizret walsinatsslaw instead of veizret walsinats

Why is it so?

share|improve this question
1  
You obviously know about std::string, why are you using char* and new? You might also look into standard library functions such as std::reverse. –  Blastfurnace Jan 13 '13 at 23:48
    
For exercise reasons:). –  Stanislaw T Jan 13 '13 at 23:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Two problems in your code.

First, you want backwards to be fnsize + 1 to allow for the end of string termination (required for a C-style string, not included in the std::string::size() method return value).

Second, make the last element of backwards a '\0' character (the end of string character). Without this, std::cout does not know where the char* 'ends' so you will sometimes get garbage characters. That is to say std::cout will keep outputting characters until it hits a '\0'.

A couple of other options you could look at as well:

  1. Make backwards a std::string and use append(fullname[a-1])
  2. Use std::reverse
share|improve this answer

I guess you forgot null terminator '\0', you need to:

backwards = new char [fnsize+1];
backward[fnsize] = '\0';
share|improve this answer
    
Yes that was it. However I am curious as to why it presented itself only sometimes. Could somebody explain in a noobfriendly way please? –  Stanislaw T Jan 13 '13 at 23:48
    
@StanislawT It's called undefined behavior. Situations like this cause it and it's possible that nothing can happen as a result. –  0x499602D2 Jan 13 '13 at 23:49

You can do this much more cleanly without managing memory (or worrying about the nul terminator) yourself:

#include <string>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    std::cout << "What is your first name?\n";
    std::string first, second;
    std::cin >> first;
    std::cout << "What is your second name?\n";
    std::cin >> second;
    std::string fullname(first + " " + second);
    std::string backwards(fullname.rbegin(), fullname.rend()); // use reverse iterator
    std::cout << backwards << std::endl;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I wish I could downvote this. I really did not care for a more effective or appropriate way to do this. The question was "Why this happened?", not "How shall I improve my code?". –  Stanislaw T Jan 13 '13 at 23:55
    
So my answer didn't fix your problems with nul terminating by removing the need to nul terminate? –  Troy Jan 13 '13 at 23:57
    
No where in your question does it say, please maintain the manual memory management, or that you did not want to use a std::string in the reversal. So there is no problem wih my answer, your question was simply not specific enough. –  Troy Jan 13 '13 at 23:58
    
My problem was that I did not understand what caused the wierd behavior. That is why I asked "Why?". –  Stanislaw T Jan 14 '13 at 0:00

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