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I'm using visual studios 2010 to create a c# web application with a database. My goal is to have default.aspx call a c# class which runs a stored procedure that selects an entry from the table and returns it. Here's the code:

'The stored procedure.  I want it to send back the name it gets from doing
'the query to the c# class.
ALTER PROCEDURE getName (@id int)
AS
BEGIN
SET NOCOUNT ON;

--   
SELECT name FROM tableA where id = @id;

END 
Return
//Here's the c# class I'm using.
public class student
{
    public string name;
    public int id;

    public student()
    { }

    public String doQuery(int id)
    {
        SqlConnection conn = null;

        try
        {
             conn = new SqlConnection("Server =(local); Database = Database1.mdf;
   Integrated Security = SSPI");
            conn.Open();
            SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("getName", conn);
            cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
            SqlParameter param = new SqlParameter("@id", SqlDbType.Int);
            param.Direction = ParameterDirection.Input;
            param.Value = id;
            cmd.Parameters.Add(param);
            //This is some code from when I tryed return value
            //SqlParameter reVal = cmd.Parameters.Add("@name", SqlDbType.VarChar);
            //reVal.Direction = ParameterDirection.ReturnValue;

            //before using ExecuteScalar I tried ExcuteNonQuery with the commented    
            //out code
            name = (string)cmd.ExecuteScalar();

            //name = (String)cmd.Parameters["@name"].Value;

            conn.Close();
        }

        catch(Exception)
        {}
        return name;
    }
}

Running my program does not return errors it simply doesn't place any value in name. What am I missing to get the name that is selected in the sql procedure into the name variable in my c# class. I hope I'm conveying my problem clearly.

edit1:I didn't put anything in the catch cause hadn't decided what to use to see that it had errored out. I changed it to make name = "error" when it fails the try and that's what I get and that's what I get. I also tried running "exec getName 5, otherstuff"in sql server management. I'm a little unclear about what to use as the second parameter when running exec getName since the second parameter is suppose to be just output but still seems to be required to run it. It just says the commands are executed successfully but doesn't display the name that goes with id 5

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3  
It doesn't return any errors because you are trapping and ignoring all exceptions it might raise. Put a breakpoint in the exception handler to see if one is being raised. –  ChrisF Jan 13 '13 at 23:55
    
An empty catch block is about as useful as locking the barn doors after the horses have bolted :) –  Tim Jan 13 '13 at 23:57
1  
Have you tried running the stored procedure in SQL Server Management Studio to ensure it's returning data? –  Tim Jan 13 '13 at 23:57
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2 Answers

The problem is in your connection string: unless you have strange naming conventions, you are specifying the database file name and not the name of the database itself.

Try changing this part of the connection string: Database = Database1.mdf; to Database = Database1;.

If you are confused about what is or is not valid in the connection string, you can always use the SqlConnectionStringBuilder which will create the appropriate connection string for you after you have set the correct properties.

You can also use the list of properties specified in the SqlConnection.ConnectionString documentation as a reference that contains examples.

Finally, I strongly recommend the following best practices:

1) Use using blocks with the connection and commands to ensure they are properly closed and disposed.

2) Do not assign name directly to the result of ExecuteScalar in case it is return as DBNull.Value

3) Never ignore exceptions unless you have documented why you are doing so in the code.

Here is a quick rewrite with all of the above recommendations:

        try
        {
            using (var conn = new SqlConnection("Server =(local); Database = Database1; Integrated Security = SSPI"))
            {
                conn.Open();
                using (var cmd = new SqlCommand("getName", conn))
                {
                    cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
                    var param = new SqlParameter("@id", SqlDbType.Int);
                    param.Direction = ParameterDirection.Input;
                    param.Value = id;
                    cmd.Parameters.Add(param);

                    var oResult = cmd.ExecuteScalar();
                    if ((oResult != null) && (oResult != DBNull.Value))
                    {
                        name = (string)oResult;
                    }
                }
                conn.Close();
            }
        }

        catch (Exception)
        { 
            //  Do something with the exception here, don't just ignore it
        }
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I would recommend using the async/await pattern for SQL statements. Fortunately, it doesn't require much refactoring.

See if this works for you:

public async Task<string> QueryGetNameAsync(int id)
{
  using (var dbConn = new SqlConnection("..."))
  using (var command = new SqlCommand("getName", dbConn))
  {
    try
    {
      command.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
      command.Parameters.AddWithValue("@id", id);

      await dbConn.OpenAsync();

      var result = await command.ExecuteScalarAsync();
      dbConn.Close();

      var name = result as string;          
      return name;
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
      // Handle exception here.
    }
  }
}

You'd call it with something like:

private async void DoLookup_Clicked(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
   var id = int.Parse(idText.Text);
   var name = await QueryGetNameAsync(id);
}

Alternatively, can use OUTPUT parameters in SQL but you would have to adjust your stored procedure to something like this:

ALTER PROCEDURE getName
(
  @id int, 
  @name varchar(100) OUTPUT
)
AS
BEGIN
SET NOCOUNT ON;

SELECT @name = name FROM tableA where id = @id;

END 

Then your C# function would be something like:

public async Task<string> QueryGetNameAsync(int id)
{
  using (var dbConn = new SqlConnection("..."))
  using (var command = new SqlCommand("getName", dbConn))
  {
    try
    {
      command.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
      command.Parameters.AddWithValue("@id", id);
      command.Parameters.Add("@name", SqlDbType.VarChar, 100);
      command.Parameters["@name"].Direction = ParameterDirection.Output;

      await dbConn.OpenAsync();
      await command.ExecuteNonQueryAsync();
      dbConn.Close();

      var name = command.Parameters["@name"].Value as string;          
      return name;
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
      // Handle exception here.
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the quick response. I tried to use the second option with the output variable in the procedure and ran into a problem though cause async wasn't recognized. I google searched it and the first result said that async was from Visual studios 2012. Unfortunately I'm using 2010. I tried using the code you posted without async/await with just dbconn.Open and command.ExecuteNonQuery and it didn't seem to work. –  user1974576 Jan 14 '13 at 1:07
    
Ah yes, async/await is part of C# 4.5 (VS 2012). Removing the async keyword and suffixs should work though. When you say it doesn't work, what do you mean? Any exceptions? What does command.Parameters["@name"].Value contain after the query is executed? –  SiLo Jan 14 '13 at 2:46
    
It seems like there might be a problem with the stored procedure I think it doesn't seem to run anything when I run it by itself. –  user1974576 Jan 14 '13 at 3:07
    
It looks like the procedure is working I was testing it wrong. I'm not sure what to use in the catch statement to get specific errors. any advice? –  user1974576 Jan 14 '13 at 3:53
    
Well, the Exception.Message is probably the most helpful. A SQL error is pretty easy to debug, as it's a matter of either syntax most of the time. –  SiLo Jan 17 '13 at 2:14
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