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Consider the two following code samples. All benchmarking is done outside of the container being used to calculate an average of the sampled execution times. On my machine, running Windows 7 and JDK 1.6, I am seeing the average execution time in example 2 close to 1,000 times slower than that of example 1. The only explanation I can surmise is that the compiler is optimizing some code used by LinkedList to the detriment of everything else. Can someone help me understand this?

Example 1: Using Arrays

public class TimingTest 
{

    static long startNanos, endNanos;
    static long[] samples = new long[1000];


    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
    for (int a = 0; a < 100; a++) 
    {
        for (int numRuns = 0; numRuns < 1000; numRuns++) 
        {
            startNanos = System.nanoTime();
            long sum = 0;
            for (long i = 1; i <= 500000; i++) 
            {
                sum += i % 13;
            }
            endNanos = System.nanoTime() - startNanos;
            samples[numRuns] =(endNanos);
        }
        long avgPrim = 0L;
        for (long sample : samples) 
        {
            avgPrim += sample;
        }
        System.out.println("Avg: " + (avgPrim / samples.length) );
        }
    }
}

Example 2: Using a LinkedList

public class TimingTest 
{

    static long startNanos, endNanos;
    static List<Long> samples = new LinkedList<Long>();

    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
        for (int a = 0; a < 100; a++) 
        {
            for (int numRuns = 0; numRuns < 1000; numRuns++) 
            {
                startNanos = System.nanoTime();
                long sum = 0;
                int index = 0;
                for (long i = 1; i <= 500000; i++) 
                {
                    sum += i % 13;
                }
                endNanos = System.nanoTime() - startNanos;
                samples.add(endNanos);
            }
            long avgPrim = 0L;
            for (long sample : samples) 
            {
                avgPrim += sample;
            }
            System.out.println("Avg: " + (avgPrim / samples.size()));
        }
    }
}
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5  
Linked lists are have worse performance characteristics than arrays, there's not much to it. –  vemv Jan 14 '13 at 0:14
1  
The LinkedList is not being benchmarked! The LinkedList is storing benchmark results only. –  user1975105 Jan 14 '13 at 0:19
    
@vemv That is an incomplete and misleading analysis. Linked lists have performance characteristics that are better than arrays. In addition, the question is clear in saying that the execution time of the summation code is slower in the second example. –  Will C. Jan 14 '13 at 0:24
    
My bet. The operations for adding an element to the list are longer than the operations needed for adding to an array; so you are more likely to suffer cache misses when going back into the loop code. Try putting some complex operations (a few System.out.println, creating a few new Objects) after each loop and you will see that both codes performance will converge. –  SJuan76 Jan 14 '13 at 0:26
1  
Your inner loop is essentially doing nothing. It could get removed entirely. Usual adaptive compiler behaviour means this doesn't happen immediately. The benchmarked code is in a long method, so that may influence behaviour. I'd suggest first moving the code between the two calls to nanoTime into a different method. (LinkedList generally has poor performance, even where people think it'll run fast.) –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jan 14 '13 at 0:27

2 Answers 2

Something is very wrong here: When I run the array version, I get an average execution time of 20000 nanoseconds. It is downright impossible for my 2 GHz CPU to execute 500000 loop iterations in that time, as that would imply the average loop iteration to take 20000/500000 = 0.04 ns, or 0.08 cpu cpu cycles ...

The main reason is a bug in your timing logic: In the array version, you do

int index = 0;

for every timing, hence

samples[index++] =(endNanos);

will always assign to first array element, leaving all others at their default value of 0. Hence when you take the average of the array, you get 1/1000 of the last sample, not the average of all samples.

Indeed, if you move the declaration of index outside the loop, no significant difference is reported between the two variants.

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Here's a real run of your code (renamed classes for clarity, and cut the outside for loop in each to a < 1 for time's sake):

$ for f in *.class
do
  class=$(echo $f | sed 's`\(.*\)\.class`\1`')
  echo Running $class
  java $class
done
Running OriginalArrayTimingTest
Avg: 18528
Running UpdatedArrayTimingTest
Avg: 41111273
Running LinkedListTimingTest
Avg: 41340483

Obviously, your original concern was caused by the typo @meriton pointed out, which you corrected in your question. We can see that, for your test case, both and array and a LinkedList behave almost identically. Generally speaking, insertions on a LinkedList are very fast. Since you updated your question with meriton's changes, but didn't update your claim that the former is dramatically faster than the latter, it's no longer clear what you're asking; however I hope you can see now that in this case, both data structures behave reasonably similarly.

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