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I am new to Ruby. I have used a lot of C# and JavaScript which allow higher-order functions and I typically use them on a daily basis.

Ruby seems a little strange to me though. An each function might look like:

def each
    @items.each do |item|
        yield(item)
    end
end

items.each { |item| puts item }

Yet Ruby also has some support for higher-order functions. The above could be rewritten to something like:

def each(proc)
    @items.each do |item|
        proc.call item
    end
end

items.each -> (item) { puts item }        # Or...
items.each lambda { |item| puts item }

Or even:

def each(&proc)
    @items.each do |item|
        proc.call item
    end
end

# No difference in syntax.
items.each { |item| puts item }

Which is more on par with most other languages, and is just a few characters longer. Instead of explicitly passing in a block, everything seems to use yield.

yield itself seems crazy, magical, and mysterious. After all, it's going to the origin of the call and grabbing a block immediately following the call. This seems bizarre and unnatural, and I'm not aware of any parallel of this feature in another language.

So what's the deal with yield?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yield Passes Objects to a Method's Block

[Yield is] going to the origin of the call and grabbing a block immediately following the call.

Not really. yield passes an argument to a block; it doesn't "grab a block" or do anything with it. In other words, this:

def foo; yield self; end
foo { |x| x.inspect }                                       
# => "main"

Here, yield isn't doing anything but passing an argument to the block that is passed into the foo method. Every Ruby method supports an optional block—except when a block is actually mandatory—so the only "magic" is that the language allows a block to be passed even when it isn't explicitly declared as part of the method signature.

Further Examples

To see this implicit signature in action, consider this:

def foo; puts block_given?; end
foo { |x| x.inspect }

which will print "true" and return nil, which is the expected return value from the puts method.

Of course, without yield the block doesn't do anything at all. For example:

def foo; end
foo { |x| x.inspect }
# => nil
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2  
“except when a block is actually mandatory” may be a bit misleading, especially given the remainder of the sentence’s reference to the method signature. Even explicitly specifying a block in the method signature (e.g. def f █ end) does not require a block be given. –  Andrew Marshall Jan 14 '13 at 1:32
    
@AndrewMarshall A block may be mandatory for the method to execute properly, and a LocalJumpError exception may be raised if block_given? == false. Consider def foo; yield; end; foo and see stackoverflow.com/questions/2308948/… for some related discussion on this issue. –  CodeGnome Jan 14 '13 at 1:43
    
Right, but nothing about the method call or signature itself enforces the need for a block. –  Andrew Marshall Jan 14 '13 at 1:52

One advantage of yield is it also lets you use next (like continue) and break. In other languages, for next, you might have to use return, and for break, you might have to (ab)use exceptions. It is arguably nicer to have built-in support for these sorts of operations.

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Yield is Syntax Sugar

This example of yield:

def do_something_for_each(array)
  array.each do |el|
    yield(el)
  end
end

Is just syntax sugar for:

def do_something_for_each(array, &block)
  array.each do |el|
    block.call(el)
  end
end

Pick the syntax you like and run wild with it.

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3  
The second example will run much slower than the first. –  Marc-André Lafortune Jan 14 '13 at 1:33
    
@Marc, Any guess about why? –  Guilherme Bernal Mar 18 '13 at 9:53
    
@LBg: Capturing the block (with &block) is costly. It needs to create an object and that object must be able to live outside of its scope. For example do_something could store it and call it later. –  Marc-André Lafortune Mar 18 '13 at 14:55
2  
Any benchmarks? –  yfeldblum Mar 18 '13 at 17:38

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