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I have a div that I wish to slide down and fade in and slide down (much the same as the twitter bootstrap modal).

To do this I wish to position the div using position fixed just above the visible viewport.

The issue being, that I do not know what size the div is (vertically) so I cannot just use top: -(height of div)px.

So, how can I do this with a dynamic height div?

      /-------------\
      |             |
      | Dynamic Div |
      |             |
\-----\-------------/-------/
|                           |
|         VIEWPORT          |
|                           |
/---------------------------\
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is jquery ok?............... (made me add 8 more chars) –  Scott Selby Jan 14 '13 at 0:35
    
I know I could do it with jquery, aka var div = $('#div'); div.css('top', -div.outerHeight()); but I would much prefer a css only solution! –  Hailwood Jan 14 '13 at 0:39
    
CSS only is quite difficult, especially if the div is dynamic. –  Ilan Biala Jan 14 '13 at 0:40
    
CSS calc may be able to help here, but is unusable almost everywhere. If you're using JS already, why not leave your div to the left, and move it to be above your content prior to the animation? –  Mooseman Jan 14 '13 at 0:41
    
Is anyone able to break down how the bootstrap modal does it, as I believe they do something similar? –  Hailwood Jan 14 '13 at 0:41

2 Answers 2

I've only tried it in Chrome, but it seems to work as you want:

<!doctype html>
<html>
<head>
<style>
  .hidden {
    background: red;
    width: 200px;
    position: fixed;
    bottom: 99%;
  }
</style>
</head>
<body>
  <div class="main">
    <div class="hidden">
      Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Etiam lacus ligula, accumsan id imperdiet rhoncus, dapibus vitae arcu. Nulla non quam erat, luctus consequat nisi. Integer hendrerit lacus sagittis erat fermentum tincidunt. Cras vel dui neque. In sagittis commodo luctus. Mauris non metus dolor, ut suscipit dui. Aliquam mauris lacus, laoreet et consequat quis, bibendum id ipsum. Donec gravida, diam id imperdiet cursus, nunc nisl bibendum sapien, eget tempor neque elit in tortor.
    </div>
  </div>
</body>
</html>

Basically, as I understand it, bottom sets the distance between the bottom of an absolutely positioned element and its containing block. In this case you want that to be 100%. In my example above I set it to 99% so I could see that it was in fact just peeking into the top of the window.

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And how exactly were you going to slide it down? How would you know when you slide it down enough to let Lorem ipsum be the topmost text sticking to the top of the viewport? You could indeed just use position: absolute;top: 0px;margin-top:-100%; and you would not need the position: fixed wrapper, but that wrapper is just needed so you can put the div wherever you want on the page it should not matter (except for some z-index properties maybe). In addition to my answer, seeing you are not using the position: fixed; –  Yeti Jan 14 '13 at 1:16
    
I wasn't going to slide it down at all, that's @Hailwood's gig. He asked how to position the bottom of a non-fixed size div at the top of a containing div. What to do with it after that "is another problem though, which I won't solve for you". –  ultranaut Jan 14 '13 at 1:29
    
Have you actually read the question? (I was actually going to quote here, but it seems you are trolling me, read the first and third line please, the question is quite clear about this) –  Yeti Jan 14 '13 at 11:30

The idea is to put the actual element you want to be slidable, let's call it the twitterbar, I know nothing about twitter but it sounds cool, into a wrapper div.

So, you put the twitterbar with the essential css: position: absolute;margin-top:-100%; in a wrapper div with the essential css: position: fixed;. Now you need to animate the margin-top property of the twitterbar from -100% gradually to 0%.

You can do the animation using CSS3 which is kinda cool, but not supported for all users in early 2013. Or you can do the animation using Javascript, and if you feel lazy: jQuery. This is another problem though, which I won't solve for you.

The HTML for an example (some useless styles in it, but I hope it demonstrates that it works), you can manually change the percentages of the margin-top to show that it works.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
    <head>
        <style type="text/css">
            #dynamic
            {
                position: absolute;
                margin-top: -50%;
                border: 4px dashed red;
                width: 100px;
                height: auto;
            }
            #wrapper
            {
                position: fixed;
                border: 4px dashed blue;
                width: 100px;
                height: auto;
            }
        </style>
    </head>
    <body>
        <div id="wrapper">
            <div id="dynamic">Dynamic<br />height<br />content</div>
        </div>
    </body>
</html>

PS. I hope I understood the question properly.

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