Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

In C, how do you count the number of times a while loop is executed?

In Python, I'd just create an empty list in the beginning and append the values from the while loop every time the loop is executed. I'd then find the length of that list to know how many times that while loop was executed. Is there a similar method in C?

share|improve this question
8  
If your goal was just to count the number of times the loop ran, that’s not exactly the best way to do so in Python either. –  Andrew Marshall Jan 14 '13 at 0:50
    
If you'd use that technique in C, your list would need all available memory within a second. –  wildplasser Jan 14 '13 at 0:51
    
What are you figuring? maybe gprof programa may help you? –  Jack Jan 14 '13 at 2:29

3 Answers 3

Initialise a variable to 0, and increment it on every iteration?

int num = 0;

while (something) {
    num++;

    ...
}

printf("number of iterations: %d\n", num);
share|improve this answer
3  
To by overly clear for the OP's benefit, this is the way you'd do it in Python as well, given the OP's description. I think we're missing a part of the problem, though. –  Michael Petrotta Jan 14 '13 at 0:51

initiate i = 0 and then i++ on every loop pass...

share|improve this answer

(Sorry, this is the C++ way, not C...) If you really want to go for the filling list, this is how it could be done:

#include <list>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

...

   list<int> my_list;
   int num = 0; 
   while( ... ) {
      ...
      ++num;
      my_list.push_back(num);
   }
   cout << "List size: " << my_list.size() << endl;

If you want to print the list values:

#include <list>
#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std;

...

   list<int> my_list;
   int num = 0; 
   while( ... ) {
      ...
      ++num;
      my_list.push_back(num);
   }
   cout << "List contens: " << endl;
   // this line actually copies the list contents to the standard output
   copy( my_list.begin(), my_list.end(), iostream_iterator<int>(cout, ",") ); 
share|improve this answer
7  
+1 for the effort, -1 for answering a C question using entirely C++ –  paddy Jan 14 '13 at 1:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.