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I want to iterate a loop only for some values so I am using this:

present <- c(3,5,7,8)
for(i in present)
{
   print(i)
}

which gives me

[1] 3
[1] 5
[1] 7
[1] 8

however I need to jump to the next value within the loop, say I dont want 5 to be printed in above example.

I cannot use next since I want it in nested for like this

present <- c(3,5,7,8)
for(i in present)
{
    k <- i
    "Jump to next value of present"
    while(k < "The next value for i should come here")
    {
        k <- k + 1
        print(k)
    }
}

The output would be 3 4 5 6 7 8 but the condition must check value of k if it exceeds next value of i.

Is there anyway to accomplish this?

I'll take help of C to explain further,

for(i=0; i < 10; i++)
{
   for(k=i;k <= i+1;k++)
   {
       printf("%d", k);
   }
}

The link contains output of above code http://codepad.org/relkenY3

It is easy in C since next value is in sequence, but here next value is not known, hence the problem.

share|improve this question
    
Why is 5 being skipped in particular? Do you want to avoid printing all the items that meet some condition, every second item, or what's the logic for when things should and shouldn't be printed? – Marius Jan 14 '13 at 4:14
    
The first example was to elaborate my need, however in next example you can see I want to print values that are less than next value of i so jump to next in sequence – Utkarsh Naiknaware Jan 14 '13 at 4:20
    
It is not at all clear what you want to be printed. Please be specific. – Matthew Lundberg Jan 14 '13 at 4:24
    
I think you are looking for something like mapply(seq, head(present, -1) + 1, tail(present, -1)). – flodel Jan 14 '13 at 4:28
    
@flodel yeah that is pretty much what I want. Please elaborate the answer. Thanks a lot – Utkarsh Naiknaware Jan 14 '13 at 4:35
up vote 2 down vote accepted

What you should do is loop through two vectors:

x <- head(present, -1)
# [1] 3 5 7
y <- tail(present, -1)
# [1] 5 7 8

and the function to do that is mapply (have a look at ?mapply). A close translation of your pseudo-code would be:

invisible(mapply(function(x, y) while(x < y) {x <- x + 1; print(x)}, x, y))

but maybe you'll find this more interesting:

mapply(seq, x + 1, y)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks again, Superb logic – Utkarsh Naiknaware Jan 14 '13 at 4:52

I suspect the answer is to use seq_along and use it as an index into "present", but as others have pointed out your code does not promise to deliver what you expect, even with that simple modification. The K <- K=1 assignment jumps ahead too far to deliver a value of 3 at any point and the termination condition is likewise not clear. It turns into an infinite loop in the form you construct. Work with this;

present <- c(3,5,7,8)
    for(i in seq_along(present))
    {
        k <- i
        while(k < length(present) )
        {
            k <- k + 1
            print(present[k])
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

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