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In theory, would it be possible to represent the syntax of the Java programming language using verbose, "HTML-style" markup, and then translate it to normal Java code? I think a modified syntax of this type might aid code readability, perhaps at the expense of conciseness.

An example program consisting of two classes, using normal Java syntax:

public class HelloWorld{
    public void doStuff(){
        System.out.println("Hello World!");
    }
}

public class MainClass{
    public static void main(String[] args){
        HelloWorld.doStuff();
    }
}

The same program, with proposed "HTML-style" markup (to be translated into normal Java syntax):

<class = "public class HelloWorld">
    <function = "public void doStuff()">
        System.out.println("Hello World!");
    </function>
</class>

<class = "public class MainClass">
    <function = "public static void main(String[] args)">
        HelloWorld.doStuff();
    </function>
</class>
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closed as not constructive by Will Jan 15 '13 at 14:56

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
I hope this question won't be downvoted for being too strange or esoteric - I think it's a fascinating problem to solve. –  Anderson Green Jan 14 '13 at 5:28
4  
I don't see what would be gained from this. (Though I didn't downvote). –  David Robinson Jan 14 '13 at 5:29
1  
why would you want to have such a language? :S –  sadaf2605 Jan 14 '13 at 5:29
4  
<class name="MainClass" accessibility="public"><method name="main" accessibility="public" static="true"><param name="args" type="String[]" /><mbody><statement>HelloWorld.doStuff();</statement></mbody></method></class> –  BoltClock Jan 14 '13 at 5:31
1  
How about XSLT? –  Himanshu Jan 14 '13 at 5:31

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Coldfusion is a language with HTML or XML style syntax, for building web applications.

I think they argued it would be familiar to HTML programmers (in fact, I think some of its tags are HTML tags, but I'm not CF expert).

The little I've seen of it, did not overwhelm me with a desire to code that way in the future.

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I think you are looking for something like JHTML:

From this link http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E13222_01/wls/docs45/classdocs/API_jhtml.html I can cite:

You may declare class scope objects such as variables, methods, and inner classes between the tags in a JHTML file. You may use any number of this type of java tags in your JHTML, but we recommend that you group related variables together at the start of your JHTML for maintainability reasons. In the following example, we set up some variables that are used by the HTTP servlet class. We have taken these out of the above tag so that they may be accessed from other methods, and they are not instantiated on every call. The new variable declarations now look like this:

<html>
<java type=class>
String jdbcClass = "weblogic.jdbc.oci.Driver";
String jdbcURL   = "jdbc:weblogic:oracle:goldengate";
String user = "scott";
String password = "";
</java>
</html>

In most situations it is better to use method scoped variables due to servlet threading issues. This means either declaring the variables in other methods, or directly in the body of the service method (that is, just within plain tags). For more details on threading and servlets, see Threading issues in HTTP servlets in the servlet developer's guide.

his example illustrates how to define a class method in your JHTML file that is called from the main block.

The short method getCon() initializes a JDBC Connection object that is used elsewhere in the servlet. Note that we wrap the work of the method in a try block so a failure will not break the servlet.

<java type=class>
  static final String jdbcClass = 
        "weblogic.jdbc.oci.Driver";
  static final String jdbcURL   = 
        "jdbc:weblogic:oracle:goldengate";
  static final String user      = "scott";
  static final String password  = "tiger";

  protected Connection getCon() {
    Connection conn  = null;
    try { 
      Class.forName(jdbcClass).newInstance();
      conn = DriverManager.getConnection(jdbcURL, 
                                         user, password);
    }
    catch (Exception f) {
    }
    return conn;
  }
</java>

You can call this method from any other Java code in your JHTML. Notice that the other variables declared in this block are at class scope, so they also can be referenced from any block in your JHTML.

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Yes it is possible but don't - it would be truely horrid.

Another example of a launguage like this is ant.

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This makes me wonder if it would be useful to represent HTML more concisely, like this: <html><body></></>. –  Anderson Green Jan 14 '13 at 5:42
    
I don't recall Ant being a language any more than an XML configuration scheme. –  Makoto Jan 14 '13 at 5:48
    
Then I envy you. –  Tom Jan 14 '13 at 5:49

Yes it is certainly possible. Any language that can be described using a BNF grammar can be expressed using XML markup, and with a few more contortions, using HTML markup (it's more difficult in HTML because you have a fixed vocabulary, but you can get around that using <div class="X"> instead of <X>).

An example that does this is the language pair XQuery / XQueryX, where XQueryX is an XML representation of the XQuery language.

Whether it's useful is another question. There are benefits in using an XML-based syntax for languages such as XSLT where the input and output are both XML, but there's a price to pay in verbosity.

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