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I have already gone through the answer of question @ What are the differences between const and volatile pointer in C? I understand the explanation that:

The const modifier means that this code cannot change the value of the variable, but that does not mean that the value cannot be changed by means outside this code. However, volatile says "this data might be changed by someone else" and so the compiler will not make any assumptions about that data.

Which implies that both type of variables can be changed by external event.

But,then where is the difference in usage of const & volatile?

In C, does compiler optimizations work for const?

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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

volatile and const are different in many ways, they are two distinctively different features.

Declaring a variable just as const never means "I expect this variable to be modified outside the program", I'm not sure where you got that idea from. If you expect a const variable to be modified outside the code, it must be declared as volatile const or the compiler may assume that the variable is never changed.

By default, plain const variables are just like any kind of variable, they simply can't be modified by the program itself.

Just as for plain variables, const variable behavior depends a lot on in which scope they are declared. Most often they are declared at file scope and then they behave as other variables with static storage duration, except they are (likely) saved at a different part of the memory. If they are declared at local scope, they may change from time to time when the function where they reside is called.

So there are plenty of cases where const variables may be optimized. One common optimization is "string pools", where the compiler checks if the same constant string literal appears twice in the code, and then uses the same address for them. Had you expected such strings to be changed from an external source, but didn't declare them as volatile, you'd get strange bugs.

As for volatile variables, they may be modified by external sources, but they may also be modified by the program, unlike const variables.

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Hi Lundin, Your answer is really helpful. –  Arti Jan 14 '13 at 14:53
    
@Arti Hello. If you consider an answer correct, or at least the most helpful, click the check mark next to that answer to accept it as the correct answer to your question. You should do this with the other questions you have previously asked as well. Sometimes you don't get any good answers and then it is fine to not accept any of them, but to never accept any answers at all is considered rude on Stack Overflow. –  Lundin Jan 14 '13 at 15:00
1  
Lundin, yeah sure. Can you plz clear one more related doubt, I agree that I should not expect const being modified outside the program(or by external event), but external events can still modify it outside,unexpectedly. I mean is there any strict mechanism or compiler action, which prevents const to be modified outside unexpectedly? –  Arti Jan 14 '13 at 15:01
    
@Arti There is the case where const variables reside in RAM but are written to accidentally by a bug. To prevent against that, modern CPUs have virtual memory hardware support, yielding a hardware exception should it happen. –  Lundin Jan 14 '13 at 19:53
    
@Arti Apart from that, const variables are only modified externally if it makes sense that they are modified. Examples are read-only hardware registers and non-volatile memory (flash, eeprom etc) which are written to through boot loaders or flash programming algorithms. That is always something that the programmer intended and therefore it doesn't make any sense to prevent such variables from getting modified. –  Lundin Jan 14 '13 at 19:54
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Objects with const-qualified type are objects like other objects that you may declare in your program, only that you don't have the right to modify them. The underlying object may change for example by aliasing and the compiler has to take care, as for all other objects if such events could have happend. For example

void toto(double const* pi, double* x) {
  printf("%g %g\n", *pi, *x);
  printf("%g %g\n", *pi, *x);
  *x = 5.0;
  printf("%g %g\n", *pi, *x);
}

Here it is perfectly ok to call toto with something like toto(&a, &a) and so inside the function pi and x point to the same memory. For the second printf the compiler can assume since it did no store in the mean time that the values of *pi and *x have not changed. But for the third printf it cannot foresee if *pi has changed so it has to reload the value from memory.

volatile is different from that.

void tutu(double volatile* pi, double* x) {
  printf("%g %g\n", *pi, *x);
  printf("%g %g\n", *pi, *x);
}

Here, for the second printf as before the compiler can assume that *x hasn't changed, but for *pi it must assume that it could have and must reload it from memory. Use cases for volatile are much rarer in daily programmers life, they mainly concern objects that

  • might represent some hardware address
  • that could change in an interrupt handler
  • under some setjmp/longjmp mechanism
  • or by a different thread
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It is better to avoid the term “const object”. There is no such thing in the C standard, and this suggests a notion that it is the object that has the const property. In the C standard, it is a type, not an object, that may be const-qualified, and an lvalue may not be changed through a const-qualified type. This makes it clearer that it is the type through which an object is referred to that controls whether it is read-only or not, not the object, and hence makes it clearer that an object may be read-only when accessed one way and not read-only when accessed another way. –  Eric Postpischil Jan 14 '13 at 11:52
    
@Eric, you are right for what I wrote, see my edit. But your are not completely right for the global picture. Objects have types, either the one by which they were declared (normal "variables") or the first complete type through which they where accessed (e.g if an object is allocated through malloc). –  Jens Gustedt Jan 14 '13 at 11:59
    
@Eric: C99 uses the phrase "const object" twice that I can find -- once in an example and once in a note. I think that this is intended to be synonymous with the phrase in 6.7.3/5, "an object defined with a const-qualified type", otherwise the remarks made do not follow. So, there is such a thing as a "const object" in the C standard, and it means what Jens uses it to mean. –  Steve Jessop Jan 14 '13 at 12:33
    
(a) C 2011 cancels and replaces C 1999. (b) Examples are not part of the normative part of the standard, per paragraph 6 in the Foreward. (c) The occurrences of “const object” in C 1999 were changed in 2011 for good reason: The term is not defined and conveys the wrong impression. If you want to claim a mechanical adherence to an unstated part of an obsolete standard, fine, there is no law preventing you from doing so. If you want to promote the finest understanding and use the terms as they are actually defined, then you should think again. –  Eric Postpischil Jan 14 '13 at 14:07
    
@EricPostpischil, I don't see what you are after. C11 clearly uses the term of "object type" and this cannot be understood much differently than the type of an object. In 6.7.9 it even talks of "the type of the entity to be initialized" in the constraint section. And then in the sematics section it talks of "objects of structure and union type", and generally clearly uses the concept of the type of an object. –  Jens Gustedt Jan 14 '13 at 14:28
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'const' tells the compiler that the value is never changed, not by the program and not by someone else. When something is const, the compiler will optimize the code accordingly, and will usually replace the variable with constants in code. So even if it changes outside, the program may never know.

'volatile', on the contrary tells the compiler that the variable can be changed from the outside anytime, and then the compiler will not perform such optimizations, as putting the var in a register, but will always read it from memory, in case it changed.

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No, wrong. A const qualified object can be changed from "outside". –  Jens Gustedt Jan 14 '13 at 10:00
    
const is silent about whether an object may be changed in ways unknown to the implementation (not necessarily external to the program). If an lvalue is only const, the object may not be so changed. This is because that is the default, not because it is const. If an lvalue is both const and volatile, then it may not be used to modify the object, but something unknown to the implementation may modify the object. –  Eric Postpischil Jan 14 '13 at 10:21
    
I didn't say it can't be changed, it is a hint to the compiler that it won't be changed. –  Vlad Krasnov Jan 14 '13 at 11:39
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Example for demonstrating const

  function1()
  {
      int i = 10;
      function2(&i);
  }
 function2(int const *ptr) // usage of const
 {
      *ptr = 20; //will cause error; outside function can't be modify the value of i
 }

Example for volatile

 function1()
 {
       while(1)
       {
             i = 20;

              print(i);
       }
 }

 function2()
 {
       i = 20;
       while(1)
       {
              print(i);
       }
 }

consider these two function. both are seem to be same. for optimisation compiler convert function1 to function2. problem is that if value of i changed by another thread then two function become different, here while loop print value of i and another module change the value of i. so we will not get the value of i as 20 always.

volatile is used to inform the compiler not to optimise the variable.

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The const modifier means that this code cannot change the value of the variable, but that does not mean that the value cannot be changed by means outside this code.

There are two different ways to apply the const qualifier.

A const-qualified object must not be modified by the program or the program has undefined behavior. A const volatile object can be modified by the OS/hardware/whatever, but not assigned to by the program. For the avoidance of doubt, a const object is one whose definition uses a const type for it.

A pointer-to-const-qualified-type prevents (at compile time) modifications via that pointer, but other pointers to the same object can be used to modify it. Behavior is defined provided the object itself is not const. However, the compiler may still assume that only the program modifies the object, accounting for arbitrary modifications by the OS/hardware/whatever require volatile.

A pointer-to-non-const-qualified-type is exactly the same as the pointer-to-const as far as modifications via other pointers are concerned.

However, volatile says "this data might be changed by something other than code in this program" and so the compiler will not make any assumptions about that data when optimizing.

So the differences are these:

#include <stdio.h>
void some_other_function(const int *);

int main() {
    int a = 0;
    int volatile b = 0;
    int const c = 0;
    int const *constptr = &a;
    int *ptr = (int*) constptr;

    printf("%d\n", a); // compiler can assume a == 0 at this point, and 
                       // replace the code with puts("0") if it wants to
    printf("%d\n", b); // compiler cannot assume a value for b, it's volatile[*]
    some_other_function(constptr); // defined in another TU
    printf("%d\n", a); // compiler can *no longer* assume that a == 0, 
                       // it might have changed
    *ptr = 1;          // there's another example of a changing, legally
    some_other_function(&c);
    printf("%d\n", c); // compiler can assume c == 0 because c is const
}

[*] Although I say it "can't assume a value", it may be that some hypothetical C implementation happens to know that there is no OS or hardware mechanism to modify an automatic variable by any means that would require volatile to detect. Especially in this case, where no reference to b has escaped the function. If so, then you might find that the implementation actually can ignore volatile in this particular code, but maybe it treats extern global volatile variables "properly" because it knows that the linker provides a means to map them to the addresses of I/O ports or whatever.

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It is better to avoid the term “const-qualified object”. There is no such thing in the C standard, and this suggests a notion that it is the object that has the const property. In the C standard, it is a type, not an object, that may be const-qualified, and an lvalue may not be changed through a const-qualified type. This makes it clearer that it is the type through which an object is referred to that controls whether it is read-only or not, not the object, and hence makes it clearer that an object may be read-only when accessed one way and not read-only when accessed another way. –  Eric Postpischil Jan 14 '13 at 11:53
    
It would be incorrect for an implementation to “know” that an automatic volatile object cannot be modified. The definition of “volatile” is that an object may be modified in ways unknown to the implementation. There are tools capable of inspecting the internal state of a program, locating automatic objects, and modifying them. –  Eric Postpischil Jan 14 '13 at 11:57
    
@Eric: on what platform? If I build the hardware and write the C implementation, I can make it physically impossible for you to modify a volatile automatic variable with no reference-escape (at least, without voiding your warranty). I'm not claiming this is common. –  Steve Jessop Jan 14 '13 at 12:10
    
You can build any hardware you want and implement anything you want for a compiler, but it is only a C compiler if it obeys the C specification. If it knows what it must not know, it violates the C specification. The most common tools for inspecting the internal state of a program are debuggers and humans. It is not uncommon to temporarily add “volatile” to a declaration to ensure it can be modified during debugging while trying to solve a difficult debugging problem. –  Eric Postpischil Jan 14 '13 at 12:19
    
@Eric: I guess that unlike you, I believe in the existence of platforms that don't have a debugger. I wish I didn't ;-) If there's no physical means to observe the behaviour that the standard calls "observable", then there's no means to determine whether or not the implementation implements the standard. I would argue that the standard cannot legislate what cannot be determined. The standard doesn't actually define what it means to read a memory location, though, so I believe the implementation would conform if there's no physical difference between "reading it" and "not reading it". –  Steve Jessop Jan 14 '13 at 12:21
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