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I'm fairly sure I'm going to say 'duh' when I see the answer to this, but my mind isn't as performant as I'd like currently so I'm spinning up an asynchronous help thread here to assist me...

Assume the following classes:

public class DerivedTicket: Ticket
{
    public ObservableCollection<TicketDetail> TicketDetails { get; set; }
}

public class Ticket
{
    public static readonly DependencyProperty SubTotalProperty = DependencyProperty.Register("SubTotal", typeof(decimal), typeof(TicketsRow));
    public static readonly DependencyProperty TaxProperty = DependencyProperty.Register("Tax", typeof(decimal), typeof(TicketsRow));
    public static readonly DependencyProperty TotalProperty = DependencyProperty.Register("Total", typeof(decimal), typeof(TicketsRow));

    public decimal SubTotal
    {
        get { return (decimal)this.GetValue(SubTotalProperty); }
        set { this.SetValue(SubTotalProperty, value); }
    }

    public decimal Tax
    {
        get { return (decimal)this.GetValue(TaxProperty); }
        set { this.SetValue(TaxProperty, value); }
    }

    public decimal Total
    {
        get { return (decimal)this.GetValue(TotalProperty); }
        set { this.SetValue(TotalProperty, value); }
    }
}


public class TicketDetail
{
    public static readonly DependencyProperty ItemIdProperty = DependencyProperty.Register("ItemId", typeof(int?), typeof(TicketDetailsRow));
    public static readonly DependencyProperty PriceProperty = DependencyProperty.Register("Price", typeof(decimal), typeof(TicketDetailsRow));
    public static readonly DependencyProperty TaxProperty = DependencyProperty.Register("Tax", typeof(decimal?), typeof(TicketDetailsRow));
    public static readonly DependencyProperty DescriptionProperty = DependencyProperty.Register("Description", typeof(string), typeof(TicketDetailsRow));

    public int? ItemId
    {
        get { return (int?)this.GetValue(ItemIdProperty); }
        set { this.SetValue(ItemIdProperty, value); }
    }

    [Field]
    public decimal Price
    {
        get { return (decimal)this.GetValue(PriceProperty); }
        set { this.SetValue(PriceProperty, value); }
    }

    [Field]
    public decimal? Tax
    {
        get { return (decimal?)this.GetValue(TaxProperty); }
        set { this.SetValue(TaxProperty, value); }
    }

    [Field]
    public string Description
    {
        get { return (string)this.GetValue(DescriptionProperty); }
        set { this.SetValue(DescriptionProperty, value); }
    }
}

How would you go about keeping the SubTotal in sync with the sum of the TicketDetails? Use a binding, or with the help of INotifyPropertyChanged, or some other way?

share|improve this question
    
Why don't TicketDetails exist as a property of Ticket? That way you'd just be interacting with Ticket, and using that to manage changes to the various values. It seems more reasonable to maintain a collection of Ticket, as (without seeing more of your problem) it seems there is a firm "belongs to" relationship between Ticket and TicketDetails here which you could model. –  dash Jan 14 '13 at 9:10
    
@dash See comments on Henk's answer. Also, feel free to answer my question based on your suggested design if you feel it's easier to solve that way. –  Brandon Moore Jan 14 '13 at 9:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could use the event NotifyCollectionChanged of the ObservableCollection to be notified about changes of the ticket details and then recalculate the dependency property SubTotal.

share|improve this answer
    
That will let me know when items have been added/removed, but then I will still need to enlist the help of INotifyPropertyChanged for when an item price changes, right? –  Brandon Moore Jan 14 '13 at 8:58
    
That's right. You would also have to attach to the property change events of all newly added ticket details. –  MatthiasG Jan 14 '13 at 9:00
1  
Sheesh, I sit and comment for 30 minutes with Henk trying to get him to tell me how my problem will be easier to solve if I change my design (since his answer clearly suggests so) only for him to finally say that this is still the answer regardless of my design. And if a guy with 120k rep says this is the answer, then I suppose I will too. –  Brandon Moore Jan 14 '13 at 9:57
    
@BrandonMoore - The answers you get will in general be as good and as detailed as the question. –  Henk Holterman Jan 14 '13 at 20:37

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