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I know this subject was discussed many times here, but I couldn't find the answer for my specific situation.

I need to call in C# an unmanaged C method which takes a pointer on a struct object (I don't speak C fluently :

int doStuff(MYGRID* grid, int x);

But the struct itself references an other struct object :

struct MYGRID {

    int hgap;
    int vgap;

    MYIMAGE* image;

}

struct MYIMAGE {

    int res;
    int width;
    int height;

}

And I also need to set directly the image pointer like this :

MYGRID* pGrid = new MYGRID;
MYIMAGE* pImage = new MYIMAGE;
pGrid->image = pImage;

So, my question is : in C# code, should I use a "struct" object and passing it by "ref" like the P/Invoke Interop Assistant suggests me ? Which means the following code :

MyGrid myGrid = new MyGrid();
MyImage myImage = new MyImage();

myGrid.image = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(Marshal.SizeOf(image)); // A IntPtr in my struct
myGrid.image = Marshal.StructureToPtr(image, myGrid.image, false);

doStuff(ref myGrid, 0);

Or could I use "class" instead of "struct" in order to have the very simple following code :

MyGrid myGrid = new MyGrid();
MyImage myImage = new MyImage();

myGrid.image = myImage;

doStuff(myGrid, 0);

In the first case I use an "IntPtr" in my struct MyGrid, and just a MyImage object in the second case.

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Does the class work? If so, I'd go with that. I usually end up using classes instead of structs with P/Invoke, because it usually seems simpler. As long as it works, of course. :) –  Matthew Watson Jan 14 '13 at 9:49
    
This is just an exemple ; the real situation is quiet more complex. I have a lot of work to do before being able to test it... –  Eric David Jan 14 '13 at 10:23
    
I do not know the C langage very well. Could someone make me a small DLL to test this please ? –  Eric David Jan 14 '13 at 11:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Don't confuse C# struct with C++ struct. They are not the same thing. A C# struct is used to declare a value type. When you aggregate a value type in another type you store it directly in the containing instance instead of storing a reference to an instance stored on the heap. A C++ struct is simply a class where all members by default are public.

In your case, because MYGRID contains a pointer to MYIMAGE, you should use class as you are doing in you second example. However, the ref on the myGrid parameter should be removed.

Below is some sample code I have tested. The C++ code:

#include "windows.h"

struct MYIMAGE {

  int res;
  int width;
  int height;

};

struct MYGRID {

  int hgap;
  int vgap;

  MYIMAGE* image;

};

extern "C" __declspec(dllexport) int doStuff(MYGRID* grid, int x) {
  return 0;
}

Declaring the C# classes and the external function:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
class MyGrid {

  public int hgap;
  public int vgap;

  public IntPtr image;

}

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
class MyImage {

  public int res;
  public int width;
  public int height;

}

[DllImport("MyDll")]
static extern int doStuff(MyGrid grid, int x);

Calling the external function:

MyImage image = new MyImage();

MyGrid grid = new MyGrid();
grid.image = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(Marshal.SizeOf(typeof(MyImage)));
Marshal.StructureToPtr(image, grid.image, false);

doStuff(grid, 0);

If you turn on unmanaged debugging in your C# project you can use the debugger to step into the C++ function and verify that the classes have been correctly marshaled.

share|improve this answer
    
Thx. This is my second proposition. But don't forget I use P/Invoke to call the "doStuff" method which is unmanaged. If I do that, are you sure that the C# $MyImage image will by converted into a C $MYIMAGE* image pointer ? –  Eric David Jan 14 '13 at 10:45
1  
You must apply [StructLayout] explicitly when you use a class instead of a struct. –  Hans Passant Jan 14 '13 at 11:01
    
It was implicit. But thx. –  Eric David Jan 14 '13 at 11:09
    
@HansPassant: Thanks for pointing out the missing attribute. –  Martin Liversage Jan 14 '13 at 11:10
    
@EricDavid: I have updated my answer after actually testing the code. –  Martin Liversage Jan 14 '13 at 11:47

No, if MyImage were a class then MyGrid.image would be a managed reference, which is different from a pointer.

share|improve this answer
    
You statement is incorrect. P/Invoke performs the magic of marshaling managed types into unmanaged types. –  Martin Liversage Jan 14 '13 at 10:27
    
And I guess I should Marshal this managed reference into a pointer with "StructureToPtr" method ? –  Eric David Jan 14 '13 at 10:27

Below is my testing code, you can take it as reference.

c# code - struct

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential, CharSet = CharSet.Ansi)]
struct Items
{
    public double item1;
    public double item2;
}

c# code - caller class

class ItemManager
{
    [DllImport("CppLibrary.dll")]
    private static extern double Sum_(ref Items items);

    public static double Sum(Items items)
    {
        return Sum_(ref items);
    }
}

c++ cpp

double ItemManager::Sum(Items items)
{
    return items.item1 + items.item2;
}

c++ header

class Items
{
public:
    double item1;
    double item2;
};

class ItemManager
{
public:
    static double Sum(Items items);
};

extern "C" __declspec(dllexport) 
    double Sum_(Items * items)
{
    return ItemManager::Sum( * items);
}
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