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I get a json string with number of milliseconds after 1970 from the server in my android app.

Looks like this: \/Date(1358157378910+0100)\/.

How can I parse this into a Java calendar object, or just get some date value from it? Should I start with regex and just get the millisecons? The server is .NET.

Thanks

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6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The time seems to also have the timezone there so I would do something like this:

String timeString = json.substring(json.indexOf("(") + 1, json.indexOf(")"));
String[] timeSegments = timeString.split("\\+");
// May have to handle negative timezones
int timeZoneOffSet = Integer.valueOf(timeSegments[1]) * 36000; // (("0100" / 100) * 3600 * 1000)
int millis = Integer.valueOf(timeSegments[0]);
Date time = new Date(millis + timeZoneOffSet);
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1  
Nice example, though i got an exception. It crashed when making "Integer.ValueOf" - it made an exception with invalid int. I think its because the value exceed the max value of an int. Making it to a long instead, make it work! :) –  Lasse May 26 at 12:18
    
For dealing with negative timezone please take a look at my solution based on @pablisco answer –  edrian Aug 4 at 17:22

Copied from the accepted answer, fixed some bugs :)

    String json = "Date(1358157378910+0100)";
    String timeString = json.substring(json.indexOf("(") + 1, json.indexOf(")"));
    String[] timeSegments = timeString.split("\\+");
    // May have to handle negative timezones
    int timeZoneOffSet = Integer.valueOf(timeSegments[1]) * 36000; // (("0100" / 100) * 3600 * 1000)
    long millis = Long.valueOf(timeSegments[0]);
    Date time = new Date(millis + timeZoneOffSet);
    System.out.println(time);
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1  
Why didn't you simply fix the answer? –  Serge - appTranslator Oct 3 '13 at 14:32
    
Ya, I've just done it. I didn't aware such kind of feature before. Thanks for letting me know. :) –  doraemon Oct 4 '13 at 8:38
1  
Updated the original answer. Thanks :) –  pablisco Mar 3 at 11:16

Yeah, u can substring your json from "(" to ")", convert string to millis and pass in calendar object.

String millisString = json.substring(json.indexOf('('), json.indexOf(')'));
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I think you can get like this:

json.getAsJsonPrimitive().getAsString();

json it's a JsonElement

EDIT: You can send without the Date(), just the numbers, can't you? And if you are using JSON, why don't work with the Date Object?

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I haven't written the server side code. I just the app programmer. –  PaperThick Jan 14 '13 at 10:22
    
Okay, you can get the whole string like a said, and them use the substring that @Veaceslav Gaidarji suggested, so you can test if the String wasn't null and if have the "(" and ")" characters. –  William Bertan Jan 14 '13 at 10:25

Try this..

String jsonDate = "\/Date(1358157378910+0100)\/";
String date = "";
 try {
String results = jsonDate.replaceAll("^/Date\\(","");
results = results.substring(0, results.indexOf('+'));                       
long time = Long.parseLong(results);
Date myDate = new Date(time);

SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("dd-MM-yyyy HH:mm");
date = sdf.format(myDate);
    System.out.println("Result Date: "+date);
} 
catch (Exception ex) {
     ex.printStackTrace();
     }
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Here is a more complete solution, based on @pablisco answer:

public class DateUtils {

    public static Date parseString(String date) {

        String value = date.replaceFirst("\\D+([^\\)]+).+", "$1");

        //Timezone could be either positive or negative
        String[] timeComponents = value.split("[\\-\\+]");
        long time = Long.parseLong(timeComponents[0]);
        int timeZoneOffset = Integer.valueOf(timeComponents[1]) * 36000; // (("0100" / 100) * 3600 * 1000)

        //If Timezone is negative
        if(value.indexOf("-") > 0){
            timeZoneOffset *= -1;
        } 

        //Remember that time could be either positive or negative (ie: date before 1/1/1970) 
        time += timeZoneOffset;

        return new Date(time);
    }
}
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