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I am using jquery in an MVC web site project.

I have a simple C# controller called 'testController':

public class testController
{
    public string test(string id)
    {
        return id;
    }
}

..and a javascript function that uses it:

function myfunct(sData) {
    $.ajax({
        type: "POST",
        async: false,
        datatype: "json",
        url: '/test/test',
        data: '{' + sData + '}', //Not Working if I set sData = "id:'Hello'"
                                 //Work if I write data = { id:'hello'},
        success: function (json) {
            alert(json); //Need to return 'Hello'
        }
    });
}

..there is a way to dynamically assign the "data" parameter?

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6 Answers 6

So long as the properties within the object you pass match the properties of the type the action accepts, you can create the object as you require. Try this:

var sData = { id: 1234 }; // note 'id' matches the property in the signature of the action method

// in the $.ajax() call properties...
data: sData

This will also work with classes. For example, if you have this class and action in your controller:

public class Foo {
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

// in controller:
public ActionResult Bar(Foo myFoo) {
    // do stuff with Foo
}

You can then pass a javascript object via $.ajax in this form:

var data = { Id: 1234, Name: 'Foo bar' };

Note that the properties get mapped to those of the class in the method signature.

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If both the key and its value are dynamic, you'll need to use a slightly different syntax to create the object that you're setting as the data property when calling jQuery.ajax().

The general principle is this:

var key = 'id', value = 'Hello', data = {};
data[key] = value;

This is because in JavaScript object keys (or properties) don't have to be strings. The following are both perfectly valid and equivalent:

var obj = {id : 'Hello'};
var obj = {'id' : 'Hello'};

So if you try to use a dynamic value stored in a variable, and just pass that to the object literal when trying to create it, JavaScript doesn't know that it's supposed to be using the value of a variable with that name, and instead just treats that as being the key in the object.

In your case, you may want to change the function so that you pass it the object itself, like so:

function myfunct(sData) {
    $.ajax({
        type: "POST",
        async: false,
        datatype: "json",
        url: '/test/test',
        data: sData,
        success: function (json) {
            alert(json); //Need to return 'Hello'
        }
    });
}

Then use it like so:

var key = 'id', value = 'Hello', data = {};
data[key] = value;
myfunct(data);

As for why data: '{' + sData + '}' wasn't working, when you pass a string as the value for the data property, jQuery simply uses that as the query string for the AJAX request, and the string you're passing would not be setting the correct parameters.

share|improve this answer
    
I may have found a solution inspired by what you told me, I've added as an answer what I did, could you tell me what you think about my method to solve the problem? –  benVG Jan 14 '13 at 11:26

You could create a separated variable to send the parameters to your action in the controller.

function myfunct(sData) {
    $.ajax({
        type: "POST",
        async: false,
        datatype: "json",
        url: '/test/test',
        data: { id: 'hello'}, // pass directly your parameter in a dynamic object
        success: function (json) {
            // your can read: json.Id , json.Name, etc...
            alert(json.id); //Need to return 'Hello' in ID property
        }
    });
}

On the controller, you could get the string and return a JSon format result.

public class TestController
{
    public ActionResult Test(string id)
    {
        string valueResult = id; // process your result
        return Json(new { id: valueResult, name = 'User' }, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet.);
    }
}
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Try the following

var mydata = { key : value };

    $.ajax({
        type: "POST",
        async: false,
        datatype: "json",
        url: '/test/test',
        data: mydata,
        success: function (json) {
            alert(json); //Need to return 'Hello'
        }
    });
share|improve this answer

May be you are looking for this:

jQuery.parseJSON() in your case will be helpful: http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.parseJSON/

function myfunct(sData) {

    $.ajax({
        type: "POST",
        async: false,
        datatype: "json",
        url: '/test/test',
        data: jQuery.parseJSON(sdata),
        success: function (json) {
            alert(json); //Need to return 'Hello'
        }
    });
}
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I found a solution:

as mentioned by @ Anthony Grist in a previous answer, I need to use an object, not a string ... so using the '. eval ()' method I create my key value pairs on the fly.

Something like this:

function myfunct(sData) {
eval('var ssData = {' + sData + '}');
$.ajax({
    type: "POST",
    async: false,
    datatype: "json",
    url: '/test/test',
    data: ssData,
    success: function (json) {
        alert(json); 
    }
});
}
myfunct("id:'hello'"); //Return Hello
myfunct("id:'bye'"); //Return bye

...this seems to work for me..what do you think about?

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1  
It will work, but using eval() is generally considered bad practice. If you can you'd be better off modifying your code to use an approach that doesn't rely on it. Here is a pretty good post on why you shouldn't use it. –  Anthony Grist Jan 14 '13 at 11:35
    
ok, thanks for the opinion, then I will try to solve the problem starting from the use of your method and working on it... –  benVG Jan 14 '13 at 11:41

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