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I have any array of (Pilot) objects with a (Hanger) property, which may be null, which itself has a (List<Plane>) property. For testing purposes, I want to simplify and 'flatten' this to an anonymous object with properties PilotName (string) and Planes (array) but not sure how to handle a null Hanger property or an empty PlanesList.

(Why anonymous objects? Because the objects of the API I'm testing are read only and I want the test to be 'declarative': self contained, simple and readable... but I'm open to other suggestions. Also I'm trying to learn more about LINQ.)

example

class Pilot
{
    public string Name;
    public Hanger Hanger;
}
class Hanger
{
    public string Name;
    public List<Plane> PlaneList;
}
class Plane
{
    public string Name;
}

[TestFixture]
class General
{

    [Test]
    public void Test()
    {

        var pilots = new Pilot[] { 
                                  new Pilot() { Name = "Higgins" }, 
                                  new Pilot() { Name = "Jones", 
                                                Hanger = new Hanger() { 
                                                                      Name = "Area 51", 
                                                                      PlaneList = new List<Plane>() { 
                                                                                                        new Plane { Name = "B-52" },
                                                                                                        new Plane { Name = "F-14" } 
                                                                                                    }
                                                                     } 
                                              }
                                 };

        var actual = pilots.Select( p => new { 
                                                PilotName = p.Name, 
                                                Planes = ( p.Hanger == null || p.Hanger.PlaneList.Count == 0 ) ? null : p.Hanger.PlaneList.Select ( h => new { PlaneName = h.Name } ).ToArray()
                                             }
                                  ).ToArray();

        var expected = new [] {
                                new { 
                                        PilotName = "Higgins", 
                                        Planes = null 
                                    },
                                new {
                                        PilotName = "Jones", 
                                        Planes = new [] {
                                                            new { PlaneName = "B-52" },
                                                            new { PlaneName = "F-14" } 
                                                        }
                                    }
                              };

        Assert.That( actual, Is.EqualTo( expected ) );
    }

The immediate problem is that the line expected... Planes = null errors with, "Cannot assign to anonymous type property" but admit the underlying problem may be that using null in actual is using null is not the best approach in the first place.

Any ideas how to either assign the null array in expected or take a different approach than null in actual?

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1  
The primary issue with your updated example is because you're checking equality between an enumerator (the WhereSelectArrayIterator created by the pilots.Where call) and an array. You can use ToArray() at the end of the Where clause to force it into an array. –  Andras Zoltan Jan 14 '13 at 11:30
    
To the wider problem I'd say two things: Firstly, A very good change to consider would be making (eg) Planes be an empty collection rather than null, when there aren't any items. It's much easier to deal with; here's some background reading. Secondly, I suspect you're going to have to make the equality check between actual and expected more 'intelligent'; ie, it's going to have to dive into the objects and collections, and use something like SequenceEqual. –  AakashM Jan 14 '13 at 11:32
    
@AndrasZoltan: You are right, question now corrected :) –  petemoloy Jan 14 '13 at 11:54
    
@AakashM: empty collection: I did the background reading and I agree but I can't get the required change right within my code. Can you suggest a fix? Thanks. p.s. you are correct about the Assert too :) –  petemoloy Jan 14 '13 at 11:56
    
Hmm, of course with a sometimes-null Hanger it's harder... maybe Null Object Pattern for that. For collections, just return Enumerable.Empty<type> rather than null. –  AakashM Jan 14 '13 at 12:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

There are two things happening:

Firstly, when you construct an instance of an anonymous type using new { Name = Value}, in order to build the type the compiler needs to be able to work out the type of Value. Just null on its own doesn't have a type, so the compiler wouldn't know what type to give your Planes member.

Now, if you were using a named type for the value, you could just say (type)null and be done, BUT because you want an array of another anonymous type, there's no way to refer to is (it's anonymous!).

So how do you get null typed as array of an anonymous type? Well, the C# spec guarantees that anonymous types with members the same names and types (in the same order!) are unified; that is, if we say

var a = new { Foo = "Bar" };
var b = new { Foo = "Baz" };

then a and b have the same type. We can use this fact to get our suitably-typed null thus:

var array = (new[] { new { PlaneName = "" } });
array = null;

It's not pretty but it works - now array has the right type but a null value. So this compiles:

        var array = new[] { new { PlaneName = "" } };
        array = null;

        var expected = new[]
                           {
                               new
                                   {
                                       PilotName = "Higgins",
                                       Planes = array
                                   },
                               new
                                   {
                                       PilotName = "Higgins",
                                       Planes = new[]
                                                    {
                                                        new { PlaneName = "B-52" },
                                                        new { PlaneName = "F-14" }
                                                    }
                                   }
                           };
share|improve this answer
    
that's pretty sweet (if a little odd too!) - I'd read about that before but never found a use for it. –  Andras Zoltan Jan 14 '13 at 11:20

You have to use a typed null:

(List<Plane>)null

Or

(Plane[])null

Otherwise the compiler has no idea what type you want the anonymous type's member to be.

Update As @AakashM has rightly pointed out - this solves your problem of assigning a null to an anonymous member - but doesn't actually compile - and if it did it wouldn't allow you to refer to these members.

A fix would be to do this (unfortunately both the null and the anonymous Planes array will need casting:

var expected = new[] {
  new { 
          PilotName = "Higgins", 
          Planes = (IEnumerable)null
      },
  new {
          PilotName = "Higgins", 
          Planes = (IEnumerable)new [] {
                              new { PlaneName = "B-52" },
                              new { PlaneName = "F-14" } 
                          }
      }
};

So use IEnumerable as the member type. You could also use IEnumerable<object> but the effect will be the same either way.

Or - you could use IEnumerable<dynamic> as the common type - this would let you do this:

Assert.AreEqual("B-52", expected[1].Planes.First().PlaneName);
share|improve this answer
    
...but now, since OP wants the type to be an array of another anonymous type, there is no way to refer to it. –  AakashM Jan 14 '13 at 11:01
    
Ah that's a good point. IEnumerable might do it then, but it does wipe out any compile-time type knowledge. –  Andras Zoltan Jan 14 '13 at 11:10
    
Yes switching to IEnumerable would work - but we can fix the test code without changing the code being tested; see my answer. –  AakashM Jan 14 '13 at 11:14

Just use default(Plane[]) instead of null.

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