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Consider this method and the description:

[Description("It must be called from a property, else it is a runtime error.")]
protected T Load<T>()
{
   return InternalLoad<T>();
}

The design of this method requires that the caller must be a property, othewise InternalLoad throws an exception. It uses StackFrame to get the caller name, and if it is not of the form of get_<PropertyName> or set_<PropertyName>, it throws an exception. It all happens at runtime which I don't like.

I want to know if there is any way to make sure at compile-time that the caller is always a property. In other words, only properties should be allowed to call this method. Is there any way to check that at compile-time?

As a last resort, is it possible to extend the C# compiler which would use a custom attribute (such as CallableFromAttribute) to make sure that?

I want to make it as much flexible as possible:

[CallableFrom(Caller.Property)] //Caller is an enum
protected T Load<T>()
{
   return InternalLoad<T>();
}

[CallableFrom(Caller.Property | Caller.Method)]
protected T SomeOtherLoad<T>()
{
  //code
}

and then

public string Method()
{
    var x = this.SomeOtherLoad<string>(); //okay
    var y = this.Load<string>();          //compilation error !!
}

Let me know if there is any confusion. I will clarify it. :-)


I need this feature because I'm trying to implement a class called PropertyManager which serves as base class for other classes which need to define properties. The typical use of this class would be this:

public sealed Vendor : PropertyManager
{
    public string VendorName
    {
       get { return this.Load<string>(); }
       set { this.Store(value); }
    }
    public DateTime Created
    {
       get { return this.Load<DateTime>(); }
       set { this.Store(value); }
    }
}

Here Load and Store methods, defined in the base class, discover the name of property from which they're invoked; treating that name as key, it reads the associated value from a dictionary (in case of Load), or writes to it (in case of Store). It raises property changing and changed events. It also supports undo, as ProperyMananger can easily keep track of all changes made to a property.

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Seems to me, you should create postbuild task that will inspect your assembly and inject caller checking. May be Mono.Cecil will help you. –  Alexander Balte Jan 14 '13 at 11:40
    
I think it maybe could be done when using the new roslyn compiler services but i think the afford to do this will never get paid back. –  Felix K. Jan 14 '13 at 11:57
    
Creating a custom FxCop rule seems the way to go. –  CodesInChaos Jan 14 '13 at 11:59
1  
This is remarkably bad idea. Not sharing why you need to do this so we can offer better suggestions makes this the epitome of a too localized question. –  Hans Passant Jan 14 '13 at 13:48
1  
@Nawaz If you can install .NET Framework 4.5 on your development system, you can get VS 2010 to use that compiler by adding <UseHostCompilerIfAvailable>false</UseHostCompilerIfAvailable> to your project file. It has some potential performance drawbacks, but nothing that I noticed when I used it. –  hvd Jan 14 '13 at 15:17

1 Answer 1

No, there is no such possibility at compile time. There cannot be: all such compile-time checks are based on whether a method is accessible from the method that accesses it, not the method that calls it. If a property setter exposes Load via a delegate, there is no possible way even in a theoretical modified compiler to check at compile time that nobody uses that delegate other than another property setter.

I'm not sure why you want this, so I'm assuming that your check is necessary and your runtime check verifies exactly what you need it to. If that assumption is wrong, there may be some options, but your question as asked is simply impossible.

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