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i have 2 custom annotations, but one should always executed before the other. How do i ensure this? Is there some kind of ordering or do it with additional method definitions?

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1  
whats happening ? works randomly ? –  vels4j Jan 14 '13 at 12:33
    
Or in alphabet order? –  Roman C Jan 14 '13 at 12:34
    
It seems, that annotations descriptions in Class are stored in HashMap. This is not guarantee native order, of course. So, I think, there is no way. –  Andremoniy Jan 14 '13 at 12:38
6  
What do you mean about execution order? How annotations are processed depends on the code that uses them. What are you annotating? Which annotations are you using? –  Kristoffer E Jan 14 '13 at 12:45
3  
If they are custom annotations, custom code probably processes them, so, you could easily direct the order in said custom code of yours. –  Scorpio Jan 14 '13 at 12:46

4 Answers 4

Yes I think Annotation itself provide annotation for that like @First, and @Second etc. so you can try that

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4  
You think so or you checked it? :) –  Andremoniy Jan 14 '13 at 12:46

First annotation:

@Retention(RetentionPolicy.RUNTIME)
@Target(ElementType.FIELD)
public @interface FirstAnnotation {
  String value() default "";
}

Second annotation:

@Retention(RetentionPolicy.RUNTIME)
@Target(ElementType.FIELD)
public @interface SecondAnnotation {
  String value() default "";
}

Usage example:

public class Test {

  @SecondAnnotation("second annotation")
  @FirstAnnotation("first annotation")
  private String annotatedField1 = "value of field 1";

  @SecondAnnotation("second annotation")
  @FirstAnnotation("first annotation")
  private String annotatedField2 = "value of field 2";

  @SecondAnnotation("second annotation")
  private String annotatedField3 = "value of field 3";

  @FirstAnnotation("first annotation")
  private String annotatedField4 = "value of field 4";

  // Sample
  public static void processAnnotatedFields( final Object obj ) throws IllegalArgumentException, IllegalAccessException {

    for ( final Field field : getFieldsFornAnotation( obj, FirstAnnotation.class ) ) {
      // Do something with fields that are annotated with @FirstAnnotation
      final FirstAnnotation an = field.getAnnotation( FirstAnnotation.class );
      System.out.print( "@" +an.annotationType().getSimpleName()+ "(" +an.value()+ "): " );
      System.out.println( field.getName()+ " = '" +field.get(obj)+ "'" );
    }

    System.out.println();

    for ( final Field field : getFieldsFornAnotation( obj, SecondAnnotation.class ) ) {
      // Do something with fields that are annotated with @SecondAnnotation
      final SecondAnnotation an = field.getAnnotation( SecondAnnotation.class );
      System.out.print( "@" +an.annotationType().getSimpleName()+ "(" +an.value()+ "): " );
      System.out.println( field.getName()+ " = '" +field.get(obj)+ "'" );
    }

  }

  /**
   * Collect object fields annotated with "annotationClass"
   * This can be saved in static map to increase performance.
   */
  private static final Set<Field> getFieldsFornAnotation( final Object o, final Class<? extends Annotation> annotationClass ) {
    final Set<Field> fields = new LinkedHashSet<Field>();

    if ( o == null || annotationClass == null )
      return fields;

    for (final Field field : o.getClass().getDeclaredFields()) {
      if (field.isAnnotationPresent(annotationClass)) {
        field.setAccessible( true );
        fields.add( field );
      }
    }
    return fields;
  }

  public static void main(final String[] args) throws IllegalArgumentException, IllegalAccessException {

    processAnnotatedFields( new Test() );

  }

}

Result/output:

@FirstAnnotation(first annotation): annotatedField1 = 'value of field 1'
@FirstAnnotation(first annotation): annotatedField2 = 'value of field 2'
@FirstAnnotation(first annotation): annotatedField4 = 'value of field 4'

@SecondAnnotation(second annotation): annotatedField1 = 'value of field 1'
@SecondAnnotation(second annotation): annotatedField2 = 'value of field 2'
@SecondAnnotation(second annotation): annotatedField3 = 'value of field 3'
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From http://static.springsource.org/spring/docs/3.2.x/spring-framework-reference/html/aop.html#aop-ataspectj-advice-ordering

Spring AOP follows the same precedence rules as AspectJ to determine the order of advice execution. The highest precedence advice runs first "on the way in" (so given two pieces of before advice, the one with highest precedence runs first). "On the way out" from a join point, the highest precedence advice runs last (so given two pieces of after advice, the one with the highest precedence will run second).

When two pieces of advice defined in different aspects both need to run at the same join point, unless you specify otherwise the order of execution is undefined. You can control the order of execution by specifying precedence. This is done in the normal Spring way by either implementing the org.springframework.core.Ordered interface in the aspect class or annotating it with the Order annotation. Given two aspects, the aspect returning the lower value from Ordered.getValue() (or the annotation value) has the higher precedence.

When two pieces of advice defined in the same aspect both need to run at the same join point, the ordering is undefined (since there is no way to retrieve the declaration order via reflection for javac-compiled classes). Consider collapsing such advice methods into one advice method per join point in each aspect class, or refactor the pieces of advice into separate aspect classes - which can be ordered at the aspect level.

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You can do it by using EJB interceptors.

you can simply add interceptors via @Interceptors( { MyInterceptor.class } ) and then add for second one @MyInterceptorConfiguration(value=something).

As bkail says in their answer here:

This is only possible with CDI stereotype annotations (see the interceptor bindings page for examples) in EE 6 (EJB 3.1).

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i am using spring :) –  user358448 Jan 14 '13 at 12:50
    
This might help you, docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/guide/apt/index.html code appropriate for the annotation. –  Amol Jan 14 '13 at 12:57
    
i don't understand this. –  user358448 Jan 14 '13 at 12:59
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/1460001/… Try this way –  Amol Jan 14 '13 at 13:09
    
When you copy the words of others, you must always provide proper credit. I've edited the above to show you how this is done. –  Brad Larson Apr 8 '13 at 21:50

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