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Is there any way to use some kind of DEBUG directive in JS code causing debug code not to be included in production? Examples:

// #if debug
console.log('Initializing');
// #endif

var url =
// #if debug
    '/foo/debug';
// #else
    '/foo';
// #endif
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Javascript isn't a compiled language, so this type of behavior is not possible. You can add a compile step of course, and that step can remove things like console.log form your code. –  Munter Jan 14 '13 at 12:37
    
I'm not agree. While developing we have a lot of tools like preprocessors, autocomplete, intellisence with comments etc. There could be a tool also for this. –  Sergey Metlov Jan 14 '13 at 12:39
    
You can do that if you don't mind preprocessing your script. I'm doing this with my FF plugin, using ant and cpp. –  Felix Kling Jan 14 '13 at 13:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No. But you can simply replace console.log with a dummy function for production:

window.console = window.console || {};
window.console.log = function() { /* do nothing */ };

Then you just need to configure your build tools (assuming you have some) to include that code only in production builds.

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i'd add an "if" to prevent overriding existing console depending on when this line is executed : if !(("console" in window)) { window.console = { log: function() {} }; } –  y_nk Jan 14 '13 at 12:35
    
@ThiefMaster please look at the one more example. Can you please provide any idea for it also? –  Sergey Metlov Jan 14 '13 at 12:36

Well, you can define global variables:

var DEBUG = true;

// Somewhere else:
if (DEBUG)
    console.log('Initializing');

But it doesn't have any language features like #define.

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