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I have a tab delimited file containing regions and the respective biological entities found in these regions (I have checked for 67, hence you say each region was checked for the presence or absence of these 67 entities and their frequency).

I have all this data in a tabular format.

A sample data is given below

Region  ATF3    BCL3    BCLAF1  BDP1    BRF1    BRF2    Brg1    CCNT2   CEBPB   CHD2    CTCF    CTCFL   E2F6    ELF1
chr1:109102470:109102970    0   0   1   0   0   0   0   1   0   0   4   1   4   1
chr1:110526886:110527386    0   0   0   0   0   0   0   1   1   0   4   1   0   1
chr1:115300671:115301171    0   0   1   0   0   0   0   0   1   1   4   1   1   1
chr1:115323308:115323808    0   0   0   0   0   0   0   1   0   0   2   1   1   0
chr1:11795641:11796141  1   0   0   0   0   0   0   1   2   0   0   0   1   0
chr1:118148103:118148603    0   0   0   0   0   0   0   1   0   0   0   0   0   1
chr1:150521397:150521897    0   0   0   0   0   0   0   2   2   0   6   2   4   0
chr1:150601609:150602109    0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   3   2   0   0   1   0
chr1:150602098:150602598    0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   1   1   0   0   0   0
chr1:151119140:151119640    0   0   0   0   0   0   0   1   0   0   0   0   1   0
chr1:151128604:151129104    0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   3   0   0   0
chr1:153517729:153518229    0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
chr1:153962738:153963238    0   0   0   0   0   0   0   1   1   0   0   0   0   1
chr1:154155682:154156182    0   0   0   0   0   0   0   1   0   0   0   0   1   1
chr1:154155725:154156225    0   0   0   0   0   0   0   1   0   0   0   0   1   1
chr1:154192154:154192654    0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
chr1:154192824:154193324    1   0   0   0   0   0   0   1   0   1   0   0   1   1
chr1:154192943:154193443    1   0   0   0   0   0   0   1   0   2   0   0   1   1
chr1:154193273:154193773    1   0   0   0   0   0   0   1   0   2   0   0   2   1
chr1:154193313:154193813    0   0   0   0   0   0   0   1   0   2   0   0   2   1
chr1:155904188:155904688    0   0   0   0   0   0   0   1   0   0   0   0   1   1
chr1:155947966:155948466    0   0   0   0   0   0   0   1   0   0   3   0   0   1
chr1:155948336:155948836    0   0   0   0   0   0   0   1   0   0   5   1   0   1
chr1:156023516:156024016    0   0   0   0   0   0   0   1   0   1   4   1   1   1
chr1:156024016:156024516    0   1   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   2   0   0   1   1
chr1:156163229:156163729    0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   2   0   0   1
chr1:160990902:160991402    0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   1   0   0   1   2
chr1:160991133:160991633    0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   1   0   0   1   2
chr1:161474704:161475204    0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
chr1:161509530:161510030    0   0   1   1   1   0   0   0   1   0   1   0   0   1
chr1:161590964:161591464    0   0   0   1   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
chr1:169075446:169075946    0   0   0   0   0   0   0   2   0   0   4   0   3   0
chr1:17053279:17053779  0   0   0   1   0   0   0   0   0   1   0   0   0   0
chr1:1709909:1710409    0   0   0   0   0   0   0   2   0   1   0   0   3   1
chr1:1710297:1710797    0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   1   6   0   1   1

Now how can I put this in a heat map from colour code light red to dark red ( depending upon the frequency and white in case of absence)?

Is there any other better way to represent this type of data?

share|improve this question
1  
except for your data, can you show what you have tried? –  Inbar Rose Jan 14 '13 at 13:03
    
Hmm, this Q&A site for practical programming. I do not think that there is a specialists in infographics. –  Denis Jan 14 '13 at 13:10
    
What do you mean by huge? Many rows or columns? If one of these numbers gets close to the number of pixel you have to create your plot, it won't be a good approach. –  Thorsten Kranz Jan 14 '13 at 13:20
    
@ThorstenKranz 67 columns and 1100 rows –  Angelo Jan 15 '13 at 11:03
    
@Angelo, you should definitely save your image as a large image (using plt.savefig("output.png") or similar) so that your 1100 rows make sense. –  Thorsten Kranz Jan 15 '13 at 12:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use Matplotlib

import pylab as plt
import numpy as np

data = np.loadtxt("14318737.txt", skiprows=1, converters={0:lambda x: 0})
plot_data = np.ma.masked_equal(data[:,1:], 0)

plt.imshow(plot_data, cmap=plt.cm.get_cmap("Reds"), interpolation="nearest")
plt.colorbar()

plt.show()

I ignore the first line and the first column (if you need them for labels, we need to change this). For the remaining data, all zero-values are masked (so they appear as white in the plot) and then these data are plotted as a color-coded plot.

imshow has a bunch of other parameters to control the result, e.g. origin (lower/upper), aspect (auto/equal/some_ratio).

You write about regions - do you mean geographical regions? Then you might want to look at Basemap Toolkit for Matplotlib to create color-coded maps.

Edit

New requirements, new example

import pylab as plt
import numpy as np

fn = "14318737.txt"
with open(fn, "r") as f:
    labels = f.readline().rstrip("\n").split()[1:]
data = np.loadtxt(fn, skiprows=1, converters={0:lambda x: 0})
plot_data = np.ma.masked_equal(data[:,1:], 0)

plt.subplots_adjust(left=0.1, bottom=0.15, right=0.99, top=0.95)
plt.imshow(plot_data, cmap=plt.cm.get_cmap("Reds"), interpolation="nearest", aspect = "auto")
plt.xticks(range(len(labels)), labels, rotation=90, va="top", ha="center")
plt.colorbar()

plt.show()

Now I first read the labels from first line. I added the keyword argument aspect to the imshow-call. I create labels for each factor.

Additionally, I adjust the positioning of the plots with subplots_adjust. You can play with those parameters until they fit your needs.

The result now is: resulting heatmap

If you want other ticks for the y-axis, use plt.yticks, it's just like xticks in my example.

share|improve this answer
    
genomic regions –  Angelo Jan 14 '13 at 13:31
1  
Something like this i suspected, so you won't need it –  Thorsten Kranz Jan 14 '13 at 13:32
    
@ Thorsten, Sorry to bother you, but the image is too narrow and I do not see the labels (names of my factors, I have 67 of them) :( Kindly help –  Angelo Jan 15 '13 at 10:34
    
I created a second example that should meet your requirements. –  Thorsten Kranz Jan 15 '13 at 12:16
    
Brilliant, Thank you. :) –  Angelo Jan 15 '13 at 12:18

Due to the comments to my other answer OP had another question regarding the search of 2d clusters. Here is some answer.

Taken from my library eegpy, I use a method find_clusters. It performs a walk across a 2d-array, finding all clusters above / below a given threshold.

Here is my code:

import pylab as plt
import numpy as np
from Queue import Queue


def find_clusters(ar,thres,cmp_type="greater"):
    """For a given 2d-array (test statistic), find all clusters which
are above/below a certain threshold.
"""
    if not cmp_type in ["lower","greater","abs_greater"]:
        raise ValueError("cmp_type must be in [\"lower\",\"greater\",\"abs_greater\"]")
    clusters = []
    if cmp_type=="lower":
        ar_in = (ar<thres).astype(np.bool)
    elif cmp_type=="greater":
        ar_in = (ar>thres).astype(np.bool)
    else: #cmp_type=="abs_greater":
        ar_in = (abs(ar)>thres).astype(np.bool)

    already_visited = np.zeros(ar_in.shape,np.bool)
    for i_s in range(ar_in.shape[0]): #i_s wie i_sample
        for i_f in range(ar_in.shape[1]):
            if not already_visited[i_s,i_f]:
                if ar_in[i_s,i_f]:
                    #print "Anzahl cluster:", len(clusters)
                    mask = np.zeros(ar_in.shape,np.bool)
                    check_queue = Queue()
                    check_queue.put((i_s,i_f))
                    while not check_queue.empty():
                        pos_x,pos_y = check_queue.get()
                        if not already_visited[pos_x,pos_y]:
                            #print pos_x,pos_y
                            already_visited[pos_x,pos_y] = True
                            if ar_in[pos_x,pos_y]:
                                mask[pos_x,pos_y] = True
                                for coords in [(pos_x-1,pos_y),(pos_x+1,pos_y),(pos_x,pos_y-1),(pos_x,pos_y+1)]: #Direct Neighbors
                                    if 0<=coords[0]<ar_in.shape[0] and 0<=coords[1]<ar_in.shape[1]:
                                        check_queue.put(coords)
                    clusters.append(mask)
    return clusters

fn = "14318737.txt"
with open(fn, "r") as f:
    labels = f.readline().rstrip("\n").split()[1:]
data = np.loadtxt(fn, skiprows=1, converters={0:lambda x: 0})

clusters = find_clusters(data, 0, "greater")

plot_data = np.ma.masked_equal(data[:,1:], 0)

plt.subplots_adjust(left=0.1, bottom=0.15, right=0.99, top=0.95)
plt.imshow(plot_data, cmap=plt.cm.get_cmap("Reds"), interpolation="nearest", aspect = "auto", 
           vmin=0, extent=[0.5,plot_data.shape[1]+0.5, plot_data.shape[0] - 0.5, -0.5])
plt.colorbar()

for cl in clusters:
    plt.contour(cl.astype(np.int),[0.5], colors="k", lw=2)
plt.xticks(np.arange(1, len(labels)+2), labels, rotation=90, va="top", ha="center")


plt.show()

which gives an image of the form:

Plot with contour around clusters

clusters is a list of boolean 2d-arrays (True / False). Each arrray represents one cluster, where each boolean value indicates whether a specific "point" is part of this cluster. You can use it in any further analysis.

EDIT

Now with some more fun on the clusters

import pylab as plt
import numpy as np
from Queue import Queue


def find_clusters(ar,thres,cmp_type="greater"):
    """For a given 2d-array (test statistic), find all clusters which
are above/below a certain threshold.
"""
    if not cmp_type in ["lower","greater","abs_greater"]:
        raise ValueError("cmp_type must be in [\"lower\",\"greater\",\"abs_greater\"]")
    clusters = []
    if cmp_type=="lower":
        ar_in = (ar<thres).astype(np.bool)
    elif cmp_type=="greater":
        ar_in = (ar>thres).astype(np.bool)
    else: #cmp_type=="abs_greater":
        ar_in = (abs(ar)>thres).astype(np.bool)

    already_visited = np.zeros(ar_in.shape,np.bool)
    for i_s in range(ar_in.shape[0]): #i_s wie i_sample
        for i_f in range(ar_in.shape[1]):
            if not already_visited[i_s,i_f]:
                if ar_in[i_s,i_f]:
                    #print "Anzahl cluster:", len(clusters)
                    mask = np.zeros(ar_in.shape,np.bool)
                    check_queue = Queue()
                    check_queue.put((i_s,i_f))
                    while not check_queue.empty():
                        pos_x,pos_y = check_queue.get()
                        if not already_visited[pos_x,pos_y]:
                            #print pos_x,pos_y
                            already_visited[pos_x,pos_y] = True
                            if ar_in[pos_x,pos_y]:
                                mask[pos_x,pos_y] = True
                                for coords in [(pos_x-1,pos_y),(pos_x+1,pos_y),(pos_x,pos_y-1),(pos_x,pos_y+1)]: #Direct Neighbors
                                    if 0<=coords[0]<ar_in.shape[0] and 0<=coords[1]<ar_in.shape[1]:
                                        check_queue.put(coords)
                    clusters.append(mask)
    return clusters

fn = "14318737.txt"
data = []
with open(fn, "r") as f:
    labels = f.readline().rstrip("\n").split()[1:]
    for line in f:
        data.append([int(v) for v in line.split()[1:]])
data = np.array(data) #np.loadtxt(fn, skiprows=1, usecols=range(1,15))#converters={0:lambda x: 0})

clusters = find_clusters(data, 0, "greater")
large_clusters = filter(lambda cl: cl.sum()>5, clusters) #Only take clusters with five or more items
large_clusters = sorted(large_clusters, key=lambda cl: -cl.sum())

plot_data = np.ma.masked_equal(data[:,:], 0)

plt.subplots_adjust(left=0.1, bottom=0.15, right=0.99, top=0.95)
plt.imshow(plot_data, cmap=plt.cm.get_cmap("Reds"), interpolation="nearest", aspect = "auto", 
           vmin=0, extent=[-0.5,plot_data.shape[1]-0.5, plot_data.shape[0] - 0.5, -0.5])
plt.colorbar()

for cl in large_clusters:
    plt.contour(cl.astype(np.int),[.5], colors="k", lw=2)
plt.xticks(np.arange(0, len(labels)+1), labels, rotation=90, va="top", ha="center")

print "Summary of all large clusters:\n"
print "#\tSize\tIn regions"
for i, cl in enumerate(large_clusters):
    print "%i\t%i\t" % (i, cl.sum()),
    regions_in_cluster = np.where(np.any(cl, axis=0))[0]
    min_region = labels[min(regions_in_cluster)]
    max_region = labels[max(regions_in_cluster)]
    print "%s to %s" % (min_region, max_region)

plt.xlim(-0.5,plot_data.shape[1]-0.5)

plt.show()

I filter all clusters that have more than five points included. I plot only these. You could alternatively use the sum of data inside each cluster. I then sort these large clusters by their size, descending.

Finally, I print a summary of all large clusters, including the names of all clusters they are across. Large clusters only

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the updated code. Since my data is of 2700 regions is it possible to cluster based on rows as well. I get a very nasty image. –  Angelo May 8 '13 at 7:36
    
What do you mean by "cluster based on rows". My algorithm searches in rows AND columns. Do you mean to search along rows only? –  Thorsten Kranz May 8 '13 at 7:52
    
okay got it. Can I get these clusters in some kind of variable as well and displayed their names starting from biggest cluster (something like cluster 1 --> E2F6 and ELF1) to smallest. –  Angelo May 8 '13 at 8:04
    
Yes, you can do everything you want with these clusters. I'd recommend filtering all small clusters out (statistical fluctuations) and so on... I'll give you an example. –  Thorsten Kranz May 8 '13 at 8:40

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