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I have a program that works out the reduced mass of a molecule, and want to call that with an if function. This is the code I have at the moment:

int program ();
int main()
{
    printf("Press 1 to calculate the reduced mass of a molecule or press any other button to exit:");
    scanf ("%lg",&repeat);

    if(repeat==1)
    {
    program();
    }
    else
    {
    return(0);
    }
}

int program ()
//etc...

I'm not too experienced with C, so an explanation might be useful. Also would this make it so that you can repeat the function as many times as you like?

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closed as too localized by Jens Gustedt, ecatmur, ithcy, gcochard, Eric J. Jan 14 '13 at 17:31

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3  
Lookup conditional loops in C. while or for or do-while. –  Alok Save Jan 14 '13 at 13:00
    
An explanation of what? –  Waleed Khan Jan 14 '13 at 13:01
    
Where is repeat defined? –  Graham Borland Jan 14 '13 at 13:01
    
This is not appropriate as a question here (if there is any). Please do a minimum of research on SO or the whole web before hand. –  Jens Gustedt Jan 14 '13 at 13:02
    
int main() was standard practice many years ago and became officially obsolete in 1989. Use either int main(void) or int main(int argc, char **argv) –  William Pursell Jan 14 '13 at 13:03

2 Answers 2

If you begin in C, you could start by using the program (your compiled C) arguments. This way you can provide the program with N a number of times the program() function is to be called.

E.g.

   // Includes that have some library functions declarations
   #include <stdio.h>
   #include <stdlib.h>

   // argc and argc can be provided to the main function.
   // argv is an array of pointers to the arguments strings (starting from 0)
   int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
      if (argc < 2) return 1; // argc number of parameters including the program name itself
      int repeat = atoi(argv[1]); // atoi convert a string to integer

      // repeat-- decrements repeat after its value was tested against 0 in the while
      while (repeat-- > 0) {
         program();
      }

      return 0;
   } 

argc is tested against 2, since the program name itself is the 1st argument, you need at least 2, with N. E.g.

   ./myprog 5

will run program() 5 times.

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I'm not too experienced with C, so an explanation might be useful.
Not sure what exactly you need an explanation of:

int program (); <-- function prototype for "program" defined here so you can call it in
int main()      <--  main. 
{
    // Display a message
    printf("Press 1 to calculate the reduced mass of a molecule or press any other button to exit:");
    // store the value typed by the user as a double, also it will accept scientific 
    // notation (that’s he g part). So you could enter 3.964e+2 if you wanted... an 
    // int or even a char would have been fine here
    scanf ("%lg",&repeat);

Also would this make it so that you can repeat the function as many times as you like? No, that does not. First, it won't compile because there's no definition of "repeat"; second, you're missing a looping mechanism. for, while, do/while, recursion... whatever it maybe. Your code can be completed with an infinite loop pretty easily:

int main()
{
    double repeat = 0;
    for(;;) {
        printf("Press 1 to calculate the reduced mass of a molecule or press any other button to exit:");
        scanf ("%lg",&repeat);

        if(repeat==1)
        {
            program();
        }
        else
        {
            return(0);
        }
    }
}
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