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AbstractFieldCollection is the base class of hardwareMissingAlarm, etc. hardwareMissingAlarm belongs to another class that is a template.

alarmFieldCollection.push_back((AbstractAlarmField Device::*)  &Device::hardwareMissingAlarm);
alarmFieldCollection.push_back((AbstractAlarmField Device::*)  &Device::hardwareErrorAlarm);
alarmFieldCollection.push_back((AbstractAlarmField Device::*)  &Device::badConfigAlarm);``

Then in another function I'm reading the vector like this:

for(int32_t i=0; i<alarmFieldCollection.size(); i++) 
{
    AbstractAlarmField Device::* pAF = alarmFieldCollection[i];
    std::cout << "isRaised: "<< pDev << std::endl;
    if ((pDev->*pAF).isRaised(pContext))
    {
           .....
    }
 }

and pDev is the Device object, however pDev->*pAF returns NULL. In fact when I'm printing &Device::hardwareErrorAlarm, &Device::hardwareMissingAlarm the result is 1. I don't know what I'm doing wrong.

isRaised is a method that belongs to the class AbstractAlarmField.

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Where and how is pDev defined`? –  Olaf Dietsche Jan 14 '13 at 14:01
1  
Why do you cast the pointer to member functions? If they are truly of the right type, this is not necessary. –  Olaf Dietsche Jan 14 '13 at 14:07
    
void execute(RequestEvent* pEvt, Device* pDev, Alarm_DataType& data) that is the header. pDev is the Device that has all the fields including the alarms. AbstractAlarmField is the abstract class of AlarmField. AlarmFields are templates so cannot be instantiated when you are getting the field from the collection, because of that I'm trying to get it casting to the Abstract class –  user1977398 Jan 14 '13 at 14:32
    
"AbstractFieldCollection is the base class of hardwareMissingAlarm, etc." Is this correct or is AbstractAlarmField the base class of hardwareMissingAlarm? –  Olaf Dietsche Jan 14 '13 at 15:38

2 Answers 2

You provided almost no code but it seems like you are storing an abstract object by value, not by reference or pointer. This may lead to object slicing and any kind of memory problem as a consequence. Try to use AbstractAlarmField& as the type of Device fields instead.

share|improve this answer
    
void execute(RequestEvent* pEvt, Device* pDev, Alarm_DataType& data) that is the header. pDev is the Device that has all the fields including the alarms. AbstractAlarmField is the abstract class of AlarmField. AlarmFields are templates so cannot be instantiated when you are getting the field from the collection, because of that I'm trying to get it casting to the Abstract class. –  user1977398 Jan 14 '13 at 14:30

It is not useful to convert a member pointer X C::* to Y C::*. The Standard allows it as a reinterpret_cast or C-style cast, but with entirely unspecified results (unless you convert back to the original type). You would be better off using a virtual functor to safely get the AbstractAlarmField subobject:

#include <type_traits>
#include <memory>

struct AlarmGetter {
public:
    virtual ~AlarmGetter();
    virtual AbstractAlarmField& get(Device& dev) const = 0;
};

template <typename T>
struct AlarmMemberPtr
  : public AlarmGetter {
    static_assert(std::is_base_of<AbstractAlarmField, T>::value,
                  "Member type is not an AbstractAlarmField");
public:
    explicit AlarmMemberPtr(T Device::*member)
      : m_member( member ) {}
    virtual AbstractAlarmField& get(Device& dev) const {
        return dev.*m_member;
    }
private:
    T Device::*m_member;
};

template <typename T>
std::unique_ptr<AlarmGetter> make_alarm_getter(T Device::*member) {
    std::unique_ptr<AlarmGetter> ptr(new AlarmMemberPtr<T>(member));
    return ptr;
}

// To populate:
std::vector<std::unique_ptr<AlarmGetter>> alarmFieldCollection;
alarmFieldCollection.push_back(make_alarm_getter(&Device::hardwareMissingAlarm));
alarmFieldCollection.push_back(make_alarm_getter(&Device::hardwareErrorAlarm));
alarmFieldCollection.push_back(make_alarm_getter(&Device::badConfigAlarm));

// To use:
if (alarmFieldCollection[i]->get(*pDev).isRaised(pContext))

If it might be useful, you could also easily add an overload

virtual const AbstractAlarmField& get(const Device& dev) const;
share|improve this answer
    
The problem is that I have the same value for: &Device::hardwareMissingAlarm, &Device::hardwareErrorAlarm and &Device::badConfigAlarm; that is 1. I think that is not correct isn't? –  user1977398 Jan 14 '13 at 17:11
    
And isRaised is defined in AlarmField that inherits from AbstractAlarmField. And one device (pDev) can have several alarmFields. –  user1977398 Jan 14 '13 at 17:13
    
A pointer to member can't be 1. But if you were trying to print them, they may have implicitly converted to bool, in which case, sure you would always get "1". You'll probably find that &Device::hardwareMissingAlarm == &Device::hardwareErrorAlarm is false. –  aschepler Jan 14 '13 at 17:49
    
Yes you are right they are different ;). So my problem is when I'm getting then the alarms with pDev->*pAF, how can I check that it is my alarmField or not? –  user1977398 Jan 14 '13 at 18:25
    
I got this compilation error: error: expected constructor, destructor, or type conversion before '<' token in this line: std::unique_ptr<AlarmGetter> make_alarm_getter(T Device::*member) { –  user1977398 Jan 14 '13 at 19:03

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