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Basically, I scan through all components in a JFrame, checking if it has the method setTitle(String arg0), if it does, then set it's title to "foo". However, in order to set it's title I need to cast it to a suitable object.

    public void updateTitle(Container root){

        for (Component c : root.getComponents()){

            String s = "";
            for (Method m : c.getClass().getDeclaredMethods()){

                s += m.getName();
            }

            if (s.contains("setTitle")){                

                c.setTitle("foo"); //Here is where I need the casting 
            }

            if (c instanceof Container){

                updateTitle((Container) c);
            }
        }           
    }

Problem is, I don't know what class is it. Is there any way to cast it to itself, or I should try doing something else?

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2  
Why do you append the names of methods in a string? If some strange object had methods named set and Title, your code would break. Also, the Method object in the loop is exactly what you'd need to call the setTitle method. –  Joachim Sauer Jan 14 '13 at 13:58
    
setTitle is description in ToolBar, JFrame.setTitle, don't to create a bunch of JFrames, use CardLayout, this method is confortable accesible from Casting, same as from Reflection, –  mKorbel Jan 14 '13 at 14:02
    
@user1541106 for better help sooner post an SSCCE, short, runnable, compilable, about a few JFrames, –  mKorbel Jan 14 '13 at 14:06
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When you have a Method, you can use invoke() to call it:

 for (Method m : c.getClass().getDeclaredMethods()){
     if( "setTitle".equals( m.getName() ) {
         m.invoke( c, "foo" ); // == c.setTitle("foo"); but without the casts
     }
 }
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1  
I think it's better to use getDeclaredMethod("setTitle", String.class) here to avoid explicit iteration and potential bug if there are 2 versions of setTitle method with different arguments. –  Nikita Beloglazov Jan 14 '13 at 14:29
1  
I think, getMethod fits better than getDeclaredMethod: You would get any public setTitle-Method, independend if it is declared at the class or any of it's parent classes. getDeclaredMethods returns private methods, too, but only from the specified class, not from it's parents –  Hardcoded Jan 14 '13 at 14:33
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You can call setTitle() via reflection, not via casting

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I see, but how exactly do I do that? (using reflection it is) –  user1541106 Jan 14 '13 at 14:00
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for (Method m : c.getClass().getDeclaredMethods()){
    if (m.getName().equals("setTitle")) {
        m.invoke(c, "foo");
    }
}

Delete all other unnecessary code. Your String s is useless (because anyway, it makes no sense to append all method names and check for contains. What if the class had methods called setT and itle?)

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