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I'm updating some fortran 77 code to use fortran 90 constructs and emacs is my editor of choice. Currently, the source is in fixed format and that isn't going to change any time soon (due to external constraints). The two emacs major modes that I can choose from are fortran-mode which only highlights the syntax for fortran 77 constructs (It doesn't understand module or contains, etc. as keywords which I find pretty annoying, but it does understand fixed format -- correctly indenting the code where necessary). The other major mode I could use is f90-mode, however, that gets the indentation all wrong which is also slightly annoying. Is there any way to get the syntax highlighting from f90-mode, but the indentation structure used in fortran-mode?

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It doesn't look like being possible. fortran-mode does not really understand F90+ features (although it says "... it is for editing Fortran77 or Fortran90 fixed source form") while f90-mode does not understand fixed source format. Both modes refer each other for features that they do not implement. –  Hristo Iliev Jan 14 '13 at 16:36
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1 Answer

You can achieve some like highlighting in fortran-mode by adding

(add-hook 'after-change-major-mode-hook
 (lambda () (font-lock-add-keywords 'fortran-mode
 '(
      ("\\(CONTAINS\\)" 1 font-lock-keyword-face t )
      ("\\(USE\\)"      1 font-lock-keyword-face t )
 ))))

to your ~/.emacs (or ~/.emacs.d/init.el) file.

For a comprehensive solution some additional work with regular expressions would be needed. But with a few lines, you should be able to feel comfortable with your code. Different colors can be gained by using different faces:

font-lock-comment-face
font-lock-constant-face
font-lock-function-name-face 
font-lock-keyword-face
font-lock-type-face
font-lock-warning-face
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yeah, this is pretty much what I ended up doing. it was a pain though -- there's a lot of additional stuff to take into account... select case, closing subroutines with end subroutine foo, etc. –  mgilson Oct 9 '13 at 17:26
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