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When I execute the following code

#include<stdio.h>
#include<unistd.h>

int main(void)
{
    int i; 
    for(i=0;i<=100;i++)
    {
        printf("Percentage complete: %d %%",i);
        sleep(1);
    }
    printf("\n");
}

The code does not work, however, when I execute the following code,

#include<stdio.h>
#include<unistd.h>

int main(void)
{
    int i; 
    for(i=0;i<=100;i++)
    {
        printf("\nPercentage complete: %d %%",i); //There is a newline here
        sleep(1);
    }
    printf("\n");
}

the code seems to work. I am not sure why.

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closed as too localized by WhozCraig, Dancrumb, JaredMcAteer, Lars Kotthoff, Eric J. Jan 14 '13 at 18:48

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9  
What does "doesn't work" mean? Does it explode? –  SLaks Jan 14 '13 at 15:07
2  
What does "doesn't work" mean? What error are you getting? –  Jonathan M Jan 14 '13 at 15:07
3  
@SLaks, exploding, in some applications, would be working. :) –  Jonathan M Jan 14 '13 at 15:08
1  
Snif Snif... Is that buffered IO? Mmmm.. –  WhozCraig Jan 14 '13 at 15:10
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3 Answers

I assume you mean you don't see a new line of output every second, when you say it doesn't "work".

This is because terminals are often line buffered, meaning they won't do the work to display the incoming text until they've received a full line.

You can work around this by "flushing" the output stream, forcing the terminal to display it:

fflush(stdout);

Also, your code lacks a return statement at the end of main().

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4  
In C99 and later, if the return type of main is compatible with int, the return can be omitted. Reaching the } that ends main returns an exit code indicating success. (I still prefer explicit returns, though.) –  Daniel Fischer Jan 14 '13 at 15:16
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The printf() texts are send to the stdout buffer. This buffer is automatically flushed on a newline. So if you do not print newlines the buffer is not flushed automatically.

To manually flush the buffer use fflush(stdout), like this:

for(i=0;i<=100;i++)
{
  printf("Percentage complete: %d %%",i);
  fflush(stdout);
  sleep(1);
}

Assuming you want to update the same line over and over (having a sort of animation with the increasing percentage), you might to want \r in front of your printed text:

printf("\rPercentage complete: %d %%",i);
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printf is buffered output. The data isn't printed to the console until the buffer is full or a newline is encountered.

You can force the data to print by calling fflush on stdout.

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