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I checked out a branch called 'topic'. I am still working on topic, but I want to include changes that are now in master branch. So I did this:

$ git checkout topic
$ git rebase master

After that, there were merge conflicts for file xyz.txt. So I modified file to be what I wanted, git add it, and did git rebase --continue.

But immediatly, the same file had merge conflicts. I fixed the file again and this time had to do git reabase --skip to continue.

But yet again the same file has the exact same merge conflicts. How is this happening?

EDIT:

Previously, I had been merging master into topic branch to accomplish this purpose. Then I just learned of rebase. So I'm guessing that has something to do with it.


Here is the state of git right now right before the third commit

$ git status
# Not currently on any branch.
# Unmerged paths:
#   (use "git reset HEAD <file>..." to unstage)
#   (use "git add/rm <file>..." as appropriate to mark resolution)
#
#       both modified:      xyz.java
#
no changes added to commit (use "git add" and/or "git commit -a")

$ git ls-files -u
100644 cbf74a88604dd4ee0afe89d7aac1d179ce75e92c 1       xyz.java
100644 52841c2b4b6cc055251d533d5b83441d1329b412 2       xyz.java
100644 c45e7c6b979ec1e20b7dd70b38698193ea235abd 3       xyz.java

$ git log --graph --pretty=format:%d HEAD master topic
*  (HEAD)
*
*  (master)
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
| *  (topic)
| *
| |\
| |/
|/|
* |
| *
| *
| |\
| |/
|/|
* |
| *
| *
| *
| *
| *
| |\
| |/
|/|
* |
| *
| *
| *
| *
| *
| *
| *
| |\
| |/
|/|
* |
* |
* |
|\ \
| * |
* | |
|/ /
| *
| *
| |\
| |/
|/|
* |
| *
| *
| *
| *
| *
| *
| *
| *
| *
| |\
| |/
|/|
* |
| *
| |\
| |/
|/|
* |
| *
| *
| *
| *
|/
*
*
share|improve this question
    
Just to check, since you don't state it explicitly, when you get the conflict and edit your file, do you then do a git add <file>; git commit before you do the git rebase --continue? – twalberg Jan 14 '13 at 15:54
    
yes. I git add it. I updated the question – Alexander Bird Jan 14 '13 at 16:42
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try git rebase --interactive to validate how Git will rebase the history. There will be a list of commits that will be applied in the given order ontop of your base commit, i.e. master:

Example:

pick 12345678 # This will be the first commit of your rebased topic branch
pick deadbeef
pick ffffffff
pick 01010101 # This will be HEAD after the successful rebase

Sometimes, Git doesn't know if a commit is really new in a branch or just an existing commit (from master) with different ancestors. You can skip commits by removing them from the text file.

If this doesn't solve your conflicts immediately, there's a real conflict between the two branches. Be sure to merge the file(s) and stage them using git add. Afterwards be sure to use git rebase --continue to move on. Don't use git rebase --skip if you don't know exactly that it's useful here. (--skip will ignore the current, conflicting commit and try to apply the next commit, which might result in further inscrutable conflicts later on).

share|improve this answer

according to your graph, others use merge instead of rebase, you should make

git checkout topic
git merge master or origin/master if you want last changes to be merged too

beware, rebase will move the branch master on your branch topic

share|improve this answer
    
I think you've highlighted the right thing, and that's what I just noticed. However, I have not pushed topic anywhere else -- it only exists on my local repo. It was me who tried merging changes before. I just learned about rebase. Therefore, it's still safe for me to rebase and clean up the commit history before I ever push. – Alexander Bird Jan 14 '13 at 15:32
    
don't worry, you are working on topic, with git you can do the same thing with different manners, you can return to any commit if you want – elhadi Jan 14 '13 at 15:36

I don't exactly know how this causes the issue, but I am very sure that the problem arises from the fact that I previously was merging instead of rebasing. But I haven't pushed topic yet, so I will just go through the whole rebase process.

share|improve this answer
1  
Please, do not answer your own question if it's not really an answer. Instead, edit your question to provide additional information. – Koraktor Jan 14 '13 at 15:36
    
I see your point. I posted this because I'm positive that having previously merged the branches is the cause of this issue. So I feel this answer is accurate in it's answer to the question, but lacks sufficient precision because I don't know why this is the answer. At least, so was my thinking. – Alexander Bird Jan 14 '13 at 16:47

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