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Am I right in saying that I only need to use lock to Add/Remove/Change the List, or do I also need to lock it when iterating over it?

So am I thread safe by doing this:

class ItemsList
{
    List<int> items = new List<int>();
    object listLock = new object();

    public void Add(int item)
    {
        lock (listLock)
        {
            items.Add(item);
        }
    }

    public void Remove(int item)
    {
        lock (listLock)
        {
            items.Remove(item);
        }
    }

    public void IncrementAll()
    {
        foreach (var item in items)
        {
            item += 1;
        }
    }
}
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1  
No, that isn't safe. You will get a "collection was modified" kind of exception if another thread modifies it while you are reading it. –  Matthew Watson Jan 14 '13 at 15:53
1  
Have you considered using collections from System.Collections.Concurrent ? –  Ilya Ivanov Jan 14 '13 at 15:53
    
FYI, even if the IncrementAll was considered "thread safe" in context of calling the Add/Remove methods, it isn't thread safe with itself: if more than one thread is iterating that increment, the += operation itself isn't thread safe so you'd want to lock around it anyway. –  Chris Sinclair Jan 14 '13 at 15:58

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You should definitely lock when iterating over it too - if the list is changed while you're iterating over it, an exception will be thrown.

From the docs for List<T>.GetEnumerator:

The enumerator does not have exclusive access to the collection; therefore, enumerating through a collection is intrinsically not a thread-safe procedure. To guarantee thread safety during enumeration, you can lock the collection during the entire enumeration. To allow the collection to be accessed by multiple threads for reading and writing, you must implement your own synchronization.

Additionally, even a single read from a List<T> isn't thread-safe if you could be writing to it as well - even if it doesn't fail, there's no guarantee that you'll get the most recent value.

Basically, List<T> is only safe for multiple threads if it's not written to after the last point at which its state becomes visible to all threads.

If you want a thread-safe collection, and if you're using .NET 4 or higher, take a look at the System.Collections.Concurrent namespace.

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1  
There is no concurrent collection that supports removal of an element in the middle of the collection which is why I am trying to use List<T>. –  Cheetah Jan 14 '13 at 16:04

List<T> is not thread-safe generally. Having multiple readers will not cause any issues, however, you cannot write to the list while it is being read. So you would need to lock on both read and write or use something like a System.Threading.ReaderWriterLock (which allows multiple readers but only one writer). If you are developing under .NET 4.0 or bigger, you could use a BlockingCollection instead, which is a thread safe collection.

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No, that isn't safe. You will get a "collection was modified" kind of exception if another thread modifies it while you are reading it.

The most efficient way to fix this is to use a ReaderWriterLockSlim to control access, so that multiple threads can be reading it simultaneously, and it will only get locked when something tries to modify it.

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You're not even thread safe with what you have if you never iterate it.

You need to define what types of operations you are doing with the data structure before we can discuss whether or not it will work as intended.

In the general case though, you do need to lock while reading. As it is, someone could add an item while you're in the middle of iterating and it would break all kinds of things. Even reading a single item could be broken if you added an item in the middle of the read.

Also note that this would, at best, make each operation logically atomic. If you're ever performing multiple operations and making assumptions about the state of the data structure then that won't be enough.

In many cases, to resolve this issue, you need to do your locking on the caller side, rather than just wrapping each operation in a lock.

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You should probably use a ReaderWriterLockSlim so that multiple threads can read the collection, but only one can modify it.

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You might want to take a look at ConcurrentQueue<>();

This is basically a thread safe list (As far as i'm aware), that's rather handy. You can use it a bit like this;

   public ConcurrentQueue<yourType> alarmQueue = new ConcurrentQueue<yourType>();
    System.Timers.Timer timer;


    public QueueManager()
    {
        timer = new System.Timers.Timer(1000);
        timer.Elapsed += new System.Timers.ElapsedEventHandler(timer_Elapsed);
        timer.Enabled = true;
    }

    void timer_Elapsed(object sender, System.Timers.ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {
        DeQueueAlarm();
    }

    private void DeQueueAlarm()
    {
        yourType yourtype;
        while (alarmQueue.TryDequeue(out yourtype))
        {
           //dostuff
        }

    }

edit: Just as John said, this is available in .Net4 onwards. Read more here; http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd267265.aspx

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On IncrementAll you will catch InvalidOperationException because of the changes, made in collection. You can see it in test unit, like this:

        ItemsList il = new ItemsList();
        Task ts = new Task(() =>
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
            {
                il.Add(i);
                System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(100);

            }
        }
        );
        ts.Start();
        Task ts2 = new Task(() =>
        {
            //DoSomeActivity
            il.IncrementAll();
        }
        );
        ts2.Start();
        Console.Read();

Iteration must be locked also!!!

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