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I'm using reflection to map out objects. These objects are in managed code but I have no visibility into their source code, underlying structure, etc. other than through reflection. The overarching goal of all this is a rudimentary memory map of an object (similar in functionality to SOS.dll DumpObject and !ObjSize commands). As such, I'm trying to determine which members are being "double counted" as both a field and a property.

For example:

public class CalendarEntry
{
    // private property 
    private DateTime date { get; set;}

    // public field 
    public string day = "DAY";
}

When mapped shows:

  • Fields
    • day
    • k__BackingField
  • Properties
    • date

Where as a class like this:

public class CalendarEntry
{
    // private field 
    private DateTime date;

    // public field 
    public string day = "DAY";

    // Public property exposes date field safely. 
    public DateTime Date
    {
        get
        {
            return date;
        }
        set
        {
                date = value;
        }
    }
}

When mapped shows:

  • Fields
    • day
    • date
  • Properties
    • Date

At first glance there's nothing to tell you that the Date property's "backing field" is the field named date. I'm trying to avoid counting date twice in this scenario since that will give me a bad memory size approximation.

What's more confusing/complicated is I've come across scenarios where properties don't always have a corresponding field that will be listed through the Type.GetFields() method so I can't just ignore all properties completely.

Any ideas on how to determine if a field in the collection returned from Type.GetFields() is essentially the backing field of some corresponding property returned from Type.GetProperties()?

Edit- I've had trouble determining what conditions a property will not have a corresponding field in listed in the collection returned from Type.GetFields(). Is anyone familiar with such conditions?

Edit 2- I found a good example of when a property's backing field would not be included in the collection returned from Type.GetFields(). When looking under the hood of a String you have the following:

  • Object contains Property named FirstChar
  • Object contains Property named Chars
  • Object contains Property named Length
  • Object contains Field named m_stringLength
  • Object contains Field named m_firstChar
  • Object contains Field named Empty
  • Object contains Field named TrimHead
  • Object contains Field named TrimTail
  • Object contains Field named TrimBoth
  • Object contains Field named charPtrAlignConst
  • Object contains Field named alignConst

The m_firstChar and m_stringLength are the backing fields of the Properties FirstChar and Length but the actual contents of the string are held in the Chars property. This is an indexed property that can be indexed to return all the chars in the String but I can't find a corresponding field that holds the characters of a string. Any thoughts on why that is? Or how to get the backing field of the indexed property?

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What do you want to do if two properties share the same backing field? Or if a read-only property doesn't have one? Or the property returns a class object of some type? –  Bobson Jan 14 '13 at 16:44
    
in either scenario isn't the memory size of the structure just the size of the fields? so then wouldn't you only care to know about properties that don't have backing fields? what do those look like? –  Chris DaMour Jan 14 '13 at 16:44
    
@Bobson- Any reference types are covered in my code by using the FieldInfo and PropertyInfo GetValue() methods and then recursively looking into them for their field's and properties. The recursion chain stops essentially when it maps an object all the way down to it's value types. If two properties share the same backing field I would like to evaluate the size of that backing field only once. You led me to another question I meant to ask that I had trouble finding the answer to. Under what circumstances do properties not have backing fields? I'll edit the question to include this. –  user1106760 Jan 14 '13 at 16:53
    
@Chris Damour- That's a good refinement on my question. I believe I do only care about properties that don't have backing fields. Difficult to say what they look like because I have had trouble finding examples online. I have come across it but I've had trouble recreating it in my own managed code. –  user1106760 Jan 14 '13 at 16:55
    
@user1106760 Were those properties in Framework code? If so, could you tell us which properties do you mean specifically? –  svick Jan 14 '13 at 16:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The name of a property's backing field is a compiler implementation detail and can always change in the future, even if you figure out the pattern.

I think you've already hit on the answer to your question: ignore all properties.

Remember that a property is just one or two functions in disguise. A property will only have a compiler generated backing field when specifically requested by the source code. For example, in C#:

public string Foo { get; set; }

But the creator of a class need not use compiler generated properties like this. For example, a property might get a constant value, multiple properties might get/set different portions of a bit field, and so on. In these cases, you wouldn't expect to see a single backing field for each property. It's fine to ignore these properties. Your code won't miss any actual data.

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Thanks for your response. In response to: "A property will only have a compiler generated backing field when specifically requested by the source code." Will these compiler generated fields always be listed in the Type.GetFields() collection? –  user1106760 Jan 14 '13 at 17:06
    
Yes, but I may not have been very clear in my answer. The key point is that properties are methods not data. A property might refer to one field, multiple fields, or no fields at all. If you're interested in the memory layout of your objects, then you don't need to consider their properties. –  Peter Ruderman Jan 14 '13 at 17:10

You can ignore all properties completely. If a property doesn't have a backing field, then it simply doesn't consume any memory.

Also, unless you're willing to (try to) parse CIL, you won't be able to get such mapping. Consider this code:

private DateTime today;

public DateTime CurrentDay
{
    get { return today; }
}

How do you expect to figure out that there is some relation between the today field and the CurrentDay property?

EDIT: Regarding your more recent questions:

If you have property that contains code like return 2.6;, then the value is not held anywhere, that constant is embedded directly in the code.

Regarding string: string is handled by CLR in a special way. If you try to decompile its indexer, you'll notice that it's implemented by the CLR. For these few special types (string, array, int, …), you can't find their size by looking at their fields. For all other types, you can.

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Thank you for your response. This is pretty much exactly the question I was trying to ask. I wasn't sure if there was some clear relationship between properties and their corresponding backing fields that was available through some reflection function I haven't found yet. Sucks that there doesn't seem to be one. –  user1106760 Jan 14 '13 at 17:01
    
I'm not sure I'm entirely convinced that a property without a corresponding backing field in the Type.GetFields() collection doesn't consume any memory. I feel like there's an instance where the backing field just won't be listed because it wasn't explicitly declared... Do you have a source for that claim that I can read up on perhaps? Thank you again. –  user1106760 Jan 14 '13 at 17:04
1  
@user1106760 As I (and others) was trying to explain: you can't do that because there simply isn't any “clear relationship” between properties and fields. Properties can contain any code, so for many of them, the concept of “backing field” doesn't make any sense. –  svick Jan 14 '13 at 17:05
    
@user1106760 At the level of CIL (which is where reflection pretty much operates), a property is just a couple of methods, nothing else. Because of that, there is no way a property could consume any memory by itself. And there is no way to declare a field “implicitly” in CIL, or anything like that. –  svick Jan 14 '13 at 17:09
    
@svick- Okay I think I understand now. Thank you for your help. –  user1106760 Jan 14 '13 at 17:46

To answer your other question:Under what circumstances do properties not have backing fields?

public DateTime CurrentDay
{
    get { return DateTime.Now; }
}

or property may use any other number of backing fields/classes

public string FullName 
{
    get {return firstName + " " + lastName;}
}
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