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I'm facing a problem in a data importation script in SQL(MySQL) where I need to GROUP rows by type to COUNT how much rows there are from each type. So far, it isn't really a problem, because I know that I can do:

SELECT 
  data.type, 
  COUNT(data.type) 
FROM data 
GROUP BY data.type;

So, by doing it, I have the result:

 -------------- --------------------- 
| type         | COUNT(data.type)    |
|--------------|---------------------|
| 0            |                   1 |
| 1            |                  46 |
| 2            |                  35 |
| 3            |                 423 |
| 4            |                  64 |
| 5            |                  36 |
| 9            |                   1 |
 -------------- ---------------------

I know that in the type column the values will always be in the range from 0 to 9, like the above result. So, I would like to list not only the existing values in the table content but the missing type values too, with their COUNT value set to 0.

Based on the above query result, the expected result would be:

 -------------- --------------------- 
| type         | COUNT(data.type)    |
|--------------|---------------------|
| 0            |                   1 |
| 1            |                  46 |
| 2            |                  35 |
| 3            |                 423 |
| 4            |                  64 |
| 5            |                  36 |
| 6            |                   0 |
| 7            |                   0 |
| 8            |                   0 |
| 9            |                   1 |
 -------------- --------------------- 

I could trickly INSERT one row of each type before GROUP/COUNT-1 the table content, flagging some other column on INSERT to be able to DELETE these rows after. So, the steps of my importation script would change to:

  1. TRUNCATE table; (I can't securily import new content if there were old data in the table)
  2. INSERT "control" rows;
  3. LOAD DATA INFILE INTO TABLE;
  4. GROUP/COUNT-1 the table content;
  5. DELETE "control" rows; (So I can still work with the table content)
  6. Do any other jobs;

But, I was looking for a cleaner way to reach the expected result. If possible, a single query, without a bunch of JOINs.

I would appreciate any suggestion or advice. Thank you very much!

EDIT

I would like to thank for the answers about CREATE a table to store all types to JOIN it. It really solves the problem. My approach solves it too, but does it storing the types, as you did.

So, I have another question, based on the received answers... is it possible to reach the expected result with some MySQL command that will not CREATE a new table and/or INSERT these types?

I don't see any problem, actually, in solve my question storing the types... I just would like to find a simplified command... something like a 'best practice'... some kind of filter... as I could run:

GROUP BY data.type(0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9)

and it could return these filtered values.

I am really interested to learn such a command, if it really exists/is possible.

And again, thank you very much!

EDIT 2

Okay... I think I found it! Thank you all!!!

I agree with the @GordonLinoff comment that the best practice refers to store the types values and describe them, so you can keep the database concise and make clearer to other developers (and for you too) what exactly these things means.

But, as far as I learned (and I agree it), if you have a little set of info (and mainly if you will not really need this info) it is preferable to treat it in some other way than storing it.

So, working in my question yesterday and today I developed this query:

SELECT 
  SUM(IF(data.type = 0, 1, 0)) AS `0`, 
  SUM(IF(data.type = 1, 1, 0)) AS `1`, 
  SUM(IF(data.type = 2, 1, 0)) AS `2`, 
  SUM(IF(data.type = 3, 1, 0)) AS `3`, 
  SUM(IF(data.type = 4, 1, 0)) AS `4`, 
  SUM(IF(data.type = 5, 1, 0)) AS `5`, 
  SUM(IF(data.type = 6, 1, 0)) AS `6`, 
  SUM(IF(data.type = 7, 1, 0)) AS `7`, 
  SUM(IF(data.type = 8, 1, 0)) AS `8`, 
  SUM(IF(data.type = 9, 1, 0)) AS `9` 
FROM data;

Not a so faster, optimized and beauty query, but to the size of data I'll manage (less than 100.000 rows each importation) it "manually" does the GROUP/COUNT job, running in 0.13 sec.

It differs from the result I was expecting just for the content positioning (instead of 10 rows and two columns as the result, I got just one row and 10 columns, labeled with the matching type).

Probably I'll change the labels to some kind of identifier (like type 0 means "header") as the result order itself will match each total with its numeric value.

If you know/find any improvements or if it doesn't seems a good approach, I'll be glad to know what you guys think.

Thank you so much!

share|improve this question
    
The best practice is to have a table called types that contains all the valid values for the type (along with other information such as what the values mean). –  Gordon Linoff Jan 15 '13 at 1:41

3 Answers 3

Let's assume that you have a types table with all the valid types:

SELECT t.type, 
       COUNT(data.type) 
FROM data join types t on data.type = t.type
GROUP BY t.type
order by t.type

You should include the explicit order by and not depend on the group by to produce results in a particular order.

share|improve this answer
    
First of all, thanks for the help. I think that through this approach it will just be INSERTing the "control" rows in a different table, don't you think? My main intention was to find something like: GROUP BY data.type(0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9) as these values were a 'group by and value filter' –  Felypp Oliveira Jan 14 '13 at 22:40
    
Your query doesn't say anything about a value filter. You can create the list of values using select statements with union all. –  Gordon Linoff Jan 14 '13 at 22:46
    
Sorry about the "filter" part... I was not expecting that the answers were about to store the 'types', as my approach store them and I was trying to avoid it. I'm sorry. –  Felypp Oliveira Jan 14 '13 at 22:59
    
@user1977836 . . . All three answers are essentially the same. Mine assumes you have a types table. BlueFeet creates one using union all and sgeddes assumes you have numbers table. If these don't answer your question, then you may need to revise the question or ask another one. –  Gordon Linoff Jan 14 '13 at 23:02
    
Thanks, Gordon Linoff! I update my question with some more infos... –  Felypp Oliveira Jan 15 '13 at 0:28

The easiest way is to create a table of all type values and then join on that table when getting the count:

select t.type,
  count(d.type)
from types t
left join data d
  on t.type = d.type
group by t.type

See SQL Fiddle with demo

Or you can use the following:

select t.type,
  count(d.type)
from
(
  select 0 type
  union all
  select 1 
  union all
  select 2
  union all
  select 3
  union all
  select 4
  union all
  select 5 
  union all
  select 6
  union all
  select 7
  union all
  select 8
  union all
  select 9 
) t
left join data d
  on t.type = d.type
group by t.type

See SQL Fiddle with Demo

share|improve this answer
    
First of all, thanks for the help. I expected to find something like: GROUP BY data.type(0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9) as these values were a 'group by and value filter' because seems that I have no other way than INSERT "control" rows, with each type, in some table. By UNION I'll basically CREATE/INSERT, as far as I understand how it works, but seems a better approach, because MySQL takes care of the CREATE/INSERT/DROP queries, instead of me. I'll wait a bit more to check any other suggestions. Thanks! –  Felypp Oliveira Jan 14 '13 at 22:53
    
@FelyppOliveira the only way for you to return values that do not exists in your table is to create them, either with a table of numbers through the union all version. –  bluefeet Jan 14 '13 at 23:20
    
@Felypp I am not sure I understand your update to the question. You can easily use the union all version of the queries which doesn't insert or create a new table of data. –  bluefeet Jan 15 '13 at 0:36

One option would be having a static numbers table with the values 0-9. Not sure if this is the most elegant approach, and if you were using SQL Server, I could think of another approach.

Try something like this:

SELECT 
  numbers.number, 
  COUNT(data.type) 
FROM numbers 
left join data 
  on numbers.number = data.type
GROUP BY numbers.number;

And the SQL Fiddle.

share|improve this answer
    
First of all, thanks for the help. I think that through this approach it will just be INSERTing the "control" rows in a different table, don't you think? My main intention was to find something like: GROUP BY data.type(0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9) as these values were a 'group by and value filter' –  Felypp Oliveira Jan 14 '13 at 22:43

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