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I need to periodically distribute an updated set of files (DLL, javascript) as a patch release to multiple windows PCs of various versions (vista/XP/7 etc.). Currently I have a link on my website for each user to download the setup.exe file and manually install the patch (replaces the existing DLLs). In order to eliminate the manual process, I'm researching how to run a program automatically on windows (I assume that means a service) which will check my server periodically for an update, download it and automatically trigger the setup.exe (or some similar process to get the patch files replaced).

I'm not a windows developer per se, but have downloaded and tried to check various options (in order to not reinvent the wheel) such as Sparkle, DDay, CSAutoUpdater, Npackd and just started looking into Google Omaha - but most assume that check happens when the windows application is started using their libraries/components. I need to run an autoupdater independently of the app I'm trying to update - so I need to first get all users to run a setup.exe which should install and start my windows service so that it can run with windows daily to run a program to check, download and install the update.

I found some sample code for writing windows service on stackoverflow, codeproject also, but couldn't find how to autoinstall it (ideally with no UAC hassles for newer windows versions). All required using instalutil or some other manual process to install and start the service.

Any guidance on this would be great! Thanks - and apologies to the long winded question. Will update with additional results as I try out other products.

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Are you wanting an MSI solution? Or would you be willing to get dirty writing some code yourself? Does the patch mechanism need to include an interactive UI? –  selbie Jan 15 '13 at 5:32
    
I would like as silent an update as possible - but it is not possible to edit the main app code. I can only replace the files, and have the updated application when it is restarted. I am not a windows developer, but experienced enough to copy paste and modify example code from forums/google searches...am using #Developer instead of Visual Studio - but have access to VS2005 (.Net2 for my main app). Not sure what MSI does. –  Surge Jan 15 '13 at 7:11

3 Answers 3

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In order to eliminate the manual process, I'm researching how to run a program automatically on windows (I assume that means a service) which will check my server periodically for an update, download it and automatically trigger the setup.exe (or some similar process to get the patch files replaced).

You likely want the Windows Task Scheduler service for the "periodic" part of your statement. You use that to launch whatever code you would need to actually do the "check for update", download, copy, etc... I don't think you need a Windows Service.

You can likely script a Task Scheduler event. Or do it more programmatically with the API.

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As you mentioned Npackd I would like to describe how this can be done using it.

I agree with selbie that the simplest solution would be to just create a task with Windows scheduler.

For Npackd you would need your own repository - an XML file accessible via HTTP, for example as http://www.yourserver.com/rep.xml . Here is a simple example for a repository: https://gist.github.com/raw/4132983/dabecde48c796d4fdfa2f645bb744ac58640572c/TestRepository.xml . A user would download Npackd (http://code.google.com/p/windows-package-manager/downloads/list) and add the URL to the list of repositories.

I would define 2 packages: one for the program itself and one for the auto-updater. This way if somebody wants to update the program manually, he can do this too.

You could create or delete a Windows task using the command line tool schtasks.exe available on every Windows system.

The update command itself would be also very simple:

npackdcl update --package=<package>
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Thanks! I was quite intrigued by Npackd but wasnt sure how to create one setup.exe for first time download by the users (they are not tech savvy and wouldn't be able to download and configure npackd). I have to create a single setup.exe which will setup all that is needed to create the npackd install, setup the task scheduler and run the downloader. Does npackd face the same UAC/admin rights issues as regular installers? Any ideas? –  Surge Jan 15 '13 at 19:44
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You could integrate the following command in your .exe installer to install the command line based version of Npackd: msiexec.exe /qb- /i bit.ly/npackdcl-1_16_4 . Npackd installs all packages globally and requires administrative privileges. –  kaboom Jan 15 '13 at 20:46

You can do as follow:

  1. Maintain the version of the of the dll,exe etc in DB.
  2. Check the version of the Installed version with the version in DB, before the application start up.
  3. If the versions are diff, ask the user to update to the latest version from server.

  4. If he clicks on YES. Update the files from server.

Prasad.

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