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I'd like to set seeds in R only locally (inside functions), but it seems that R sets seeds not only locally, but also globally. Here's a simple example of what I'm trying (not) to do.

myfunction <- function () {
  set.seed(2)
}

# now, whenever I run the two commands below I'll get the same answer
myfunction()
runif(1)

So, my questions are: why does R set the seed globally and not only inside my function? And how I can make R to set the seed only inside my function?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Something like this does it for me:

myfunction <- function () {
  old <- .Random.seed
  set.seed(2)
  res <- runif(1)
  .Random.seed <<- old
  res
}

Or perhaps more elegantly:

myfunction <- function () {
  old <- .Random.seed
  on.exit( { .Random.seed <<- old } )
  set.seed(2)
  runif(1)
}

For example:

> myfunction()
[1] 0.1848823
> runif(1)
[1] 0.3472722
> myfunction()
[1] 0.1848823
> runif(1)
[1] 0.4887732
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2  
yes: by design :-) –  Romain Francois Jan 14 '13 at 18:31
1  
+1 Beat me to it. @ManoelGaldino As to "why?" I don't think this is unexpected at all. Implementing a new, separate random generator for every function environment would be terribly complicated, I would think. And possibly carry some performance overhead. –  joran Jan 14 '13 at 18:32
3  
I do think someone with greater knowledge than I should comment about how this issue affect parallel processes. –  BondedDust Jan 14 '13 at 18:56
8  
There's a small problem with this answer. Object .Random.seed may not exist if the seed has not been set or runif() (or other functions accessing the random number generator) has not been called in the current R session. Thus before storing .Random.seed one needs to check its existence with exists(), and maybe invoke runif() if it doesn't. –  Theodore Lytras Jan 14 '13 at 19:00
3  
@TheodoreLytras In an ideal world, set.seed would return the old value of the seed. –  hadley Jan 14 '13 at 20:46

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